Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Around the Arctic May 05, 2018 - 2:00 pm

New coalition government to lead Nunavut’s neighbour Greenland

Premier Kim Kielsen forms four-party coalition

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Vittus Qujaukitsoq–Nunatta Qitornai, Kim Kielsen–Siumut, Hans Enoksen–Partii Naleraq and Siverth K. Heilmann–Atassut sign their coalition agreement May 4 in Nuuk, which will see Kielsen continue as Greenland's premier. (PHOTO BY LEIFF JOSEFSEN/SERMITSIAQ AG)
Vittus Qujaukitsoq–Nunatta Qitornai, Kim Kielsen–Siumut, Hans Enoksen–Partii Naleraq and Siverth K. Heilmann–Atassut sign their coalition agreement May 4 in Nuuk, which will see Kielsen continue as Greenland's premier. (PHOTO BY LEIFF JOSEFSEN/SERMITSIAQ AG)

Greenland finally has a new government more than a week after its April 24 election.

Party leaders Kim Kielsen, Hans Enoksen, Siverth K. Heilmann and Vittus Qujaukitsoq signed a coalition agreement May 4 in Nuuk that will see their Siumut, Nunatta Qitornai, Partii Naleraq and Atassut parties attempt to govern for the next four years.

The deal followed days of negotiations held at behind-closed-doors meetings over endless cups of coffee.

The new coalition, whose political orientations range from the right to the left, does not include the left-wing Inuit Ataqatigiit and the centre-right Demokraterne parties.

The social democratic Siumut party, which has led Greenland’s government since the establishment of the assembly in 1979, earned 27.2 per cent of the vote on April 24.

As its motto, the new coalition adopted the phrase “Nunarput—together in development—with a place for everyone.”

“In order to strengthen our society’s development and its strong position in the world community, the coalition parties will work on common political goals—not only in the parliament and government, but in all parts of society,” Kim Kielsen, who remains as Greenland’s premier following the election, was quoted as saying in news reports.

The coalition members said they plan to complete new airports and work on other issues, including educational reforms.

Kielsen said the new coalition would continue to work on a constitution for Greenland, as a step towards gaining full independence from Denmark.

Greenland’s new Fisheries Act will remain among the new government’s top legislative priorities when its Inatsisartut assembly reconvenes.

In discussions leading up to May 4, the IA party disagreed with the Siumut party’s plan for handling the Fisheries Act and the framework proposed for the constitutional commission’s work.

“So we had to discontinue negotiations with the IA,” Kielsen told Greenland’s Sermitsiaq AG newspaper.

But “as a party that has existed for more than 40 years, we have experience of being part of a coalition or in the opposition, where we, in any case, can produce results,” IA leader Sara Olsvig said.

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