Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut November 06, 2018 - 11:00 am

Bye, bye, dumpcano: Iqaluit moves on its $35M waste plan

City to hold consultation on new landfill, new recycling station

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Iqaluit's landfill site, which faces downtown Iqaluit on the other side of Koojesse Inlet, could be replaced by the fall of 2020, if the city's waste management plan goes according to schedule. (FILE PHOTO)
Iqaluit's landfill site, which faces downtown Iqaluit on the other side of Koojesse Inlet, could be replaced by the fall of 2020, if the city's waste management plan goes according to schedule. (FILE PHOTO)

Iqaluit residents can take a look at how their municipal government plans to close, clean up and replace its notorious eyesore of a landfill site off the road to the causeway, at a consultation to be held at the Qajuqturvik Food Centre in building 655 next week, on Thursday, Nov. 15.

It’s part of a new waste management plan the city first announced this past July, after the federal government confirmed it will put $26.6 million into the project, amounting to 75 per cent of its $35-million cost.

The remaining 25 per cent comes from the city, through the block funding it receives from the Government of Nunavut.

That money will pay for a new landfill about 8.5 kilometres northwest of Iqaluit, a road to a gravel source, the closure and cleanup of the old landfill and a 20,000 square foot “waste transfer station.”

Residents can look at artistic renderings of the new facilities and hear a brief presentation about the project.

Mayor Madeleine Redfern, Deputy Mayor Romeyn Stevenson and Matthew Hamp, the city’s director of public works, will attend the consultation to answer questions.

The city will use the waste transfer station to recycle metal and tires, and to sort electronics, furniture and household items that could be offered back to residents for re-use.

“Tires will be shredded, baled and loaded into shipping containers destined for recycling plants further south. Scrap steel will also be compacted and loaded into shipping containers to be shipped to recycling plants further south,” the city said.

The city also says only waste that cannot be re-used or recycled will be sent to the landfill site.

That means a 44 per cent reduction in waste destined for disposal at the landfill.

Also, the system will be designed to ensure gases from waste products do not build up, reducing the risk of fires.

The cost of the various elements breaks down like this:

• Waste transfer station: $19 million

• New landfill: $10.29 million

• Road to gravel source: $3.17 million

• Decommission old landfill: $2.5 million

The city’s proposed target dates are the following:

• Start of construction on waste transfer station: summer 2019

• Start of construction of new landfill: summer 2019

• Startup of new landfill: fall 2020

• Startup of waste transfer station: fall 2020

The Nunavut Planning Commission and the Nunavut Impact Review Board must still look at the city’s plans, through an application the city was expected to make to regulators this month.

Waste Management Plan—Que... by on Scribd

Email this story to a friend... Print this page... Bookmark and Share Comment on this story...

(11) Comments:

#1. Posted by Increase in garbage fees coming? on November 06, 2018

What will be the increase in garbage fees?  Because the operating cost will be outrageously high. 

The plan is labor intensive with continuous sorting.  And expensive importing of plastic, to wrap garbage into bales. Plus monthly monitoring and repair of any plastic bales with holes.

Bales with holes, allow air and moisture to enter which become bales of black-mold. Bales with holes in the plastic will collapse as contents are decomposing inside.

Over the months and years the bottom bales, even if packed and wrapped solid, will slowly pancake and destabilize the bales above.

The sun’s ultraviolet rays will rapidly deteriorate the plastic within a year or four depending on how thick the plastic is. If 1mm, it will require numerous bale wraps.  If the stronger 8 mm plastic wrap is used, the wrap price may possibly be $3.70 or higher for one plastic wrap bale!

Coming is a guaranteed expensive dump mess and sky-high garbage fees.

#2. Posted by General Mills on November 06, 2018

Excellent news!

#3. Posted by Northern Guy on November 06, 2018

I would love to see a map that gives a more detailed location as to where this landfill will be located. I fear given the information noted in the article that the landfill will be located on the far side of the North 40 on terrain that drains down into the Sylvia Grinnell river watershed. If that is the case than how the site manages waste water drainage will be critical in ensuring that the landfill does not end up poisoning the watershed.

#4. Posted by Northern Guy on November 06, 2018

#1 I am not sure what you are on about, but I suggest that you re-read the article. The only items that will be baled will be shredded tires, which do not mold and will be loaded into sea cans and shipped to recycling facilities in the south so they will not destabilize anything. In addition baling does not necessary mean wrapping the item entirely in plastic. it could be as simple as tying waste tires into manageable chunks using metal strapping. I will agree with you that shredding and baling and shipping does sound rather labour intensive and expensive and that dumping fees for items like tires are likely to rise as a result. But that is the price for a more stable and cleaner landfill.

#5. Posted by Out of sight - out of mind! on November 06, 2018

I strongly recommend everyone read the Waste Management Plan Q&A - “Q9: HOW WILL THE NEW LANDFILL BE DIFFERENT THAN THE EXISTING ONE?The new landfill will be a bale-fill design, meaning all waste will be compacted into bales, then completely wrapped in plastic. When they are brought to the landfill, they will be stacked in neat, organized rows. By wrapping the bales in plastic, it eliminates the potential for blowing litter and the availability of organic waste for scavenger animals.”
An incinerator would have been cleaner & a heat recovery source. The ravens will have a blast with these bales!

#6. Posted by Increase in garbage fees coming? on November 06, 2018

Here #4 It’s the Scribd attachment: Waste Management Initiative Q&A…

Question #9 second paragraph: 

“The new landfill will be bale-fill design, meaning all waste will be compacted into bales, approximately 1m3, and then completely wrapped in plastic.  When they are brought to the landfill, they will be stacked in neat, organized rows. By wrapping the bales in plastic, it eliminates the potential for blowing litter and the availability of organic waste for scavenger animals.” 

End of quote.

What plastic can withstand the suns ultraviolet rays years… decades without deteriorating? 

What happens when the plastic wrapped bales in 1, 4 years are brittle as dry toast with siksiks tunnels throughout?  Are you not back to the start without a solution and now in a worse tumbling mess?  And if a fire happens in decaying garbage which now is further fed with (oil made) thick plastic.

#7. Posted by What about on November 06, 2018

What about other recycling? Will we be able to recycle plastics? Cardboard? Other materials?

#8. Posted by Incinerate! on November 06, 2018

Does it make too much sense to incinerate the trash and use the heat to warm up the pool?  The trash will just blow away and litter the environment.  Just so screwed up to make another mountain of raven feed.  Recycling is always the feel good slogan for a while then it stops with this screwy wannabe City.

#9. Posted by Recycling on November 07, 2018

“Plastic recycling is not being considered”
Seriously? What a joke.

#10. Posted by Pop Cans? on November 07, 2018

Pop Cans in everybody’s mouth up here, represent so much waste going into our dump.
What is the plan for them?
Can we recycle them at this station?
If not, go back to the drawing board, Council.

#11. Posted by RU Kidding on November 08, 2018

Interesting to note that Alnico-Eagle has a pretty clean mine at Meadowbank,and yes, they use an incinerator and recover the heat….too logical for Iqaluit I guess…

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?