Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut May 10, 2018 - 11:00 am

CanNor to spend $2.5M on Nunavut fishing industry

Inshore turbot fishery development planned for Qikiqtarjuaq

BETH BROWN
The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency will spend more than $2.5 million over four years on Nunavut’s commercial fishery. Much of that will go towards development of an inshore fishery at Qikiqtarjuaq. (FILE PHOTO)
The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency will spend more than $2.5 million over four years on Nunavut’s commercial fishery. Much of that will go towards development of an inshore fishery at Qikiqtarjuaq. (FILE PHOTO)

Qikiqtarjuaq’s inshore turbot fishery will get a kick-start, thanks to new training and research money from the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency.

CanNor is contributing more than $2.5 million over four years to bolster Nunavut’s commercial fishery, the agency said May 8 in a news release.

Of that, about $526,000 will help develop an inshore turbot fishery in Qikiqtarjuaq over the next two years.

“Experienced fishermen from Pangnirtung will provide practical training for Qikiqtarjuaq fishers,” the release said.

“As well, a large walk-in energy efficient community freezer powered by green technology is being built to hold harvested fish.”

The Hamlet of Qikiqtarjuaq will contribute $23,300 to the turbot fishery in the community of about 600 people. Nunavut’s Department of Economic Development and Transportation will provide roughly $370,000.

Nunavut’s fishery “has the potential to bring in millions of dollars to the economy and increase employment in local communities,” the release said.

“Building that sector requires extensive research to ensure sustainable fish stocks.”

The rest of the CanNor funding is going to fisheries research to be done by the Nunavut Fisheries Association, off the coast of Baffin Island.

The organization—formerly known as the Nunavut Offshore Allocation Holders Association—will get about $2 million over four years for this work.

“Science and research is the backbone of fisheries development and sustainability,” said Lootie Toomasie, acting chair of the Nunavut Fisheries Association.

A growing fishery means more jobs and a better life for Nunavummiut, he said.

That research will:

• Examine turbot stocks for species behaviour and to see if the stocks are sustainable in the Nunavut fishery.

• Explore more effective trawling technology, or fishing methods, for the North.

• Look at the commercial potential of porcupine crab.

Navdeep Bains, the federal minister of economic development, made the funding announcement.

To date, CanNor’s spending on the Nunavut fishery and related marine science adds up to more than $8 million.

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(1) Comments:

#1. Posted by Dianna Crooks on May 12, 2018

This is great news!  Money going to smaller communities to generate economic development and jobs!

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