Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Around the Arctic August 10, 2018 - 8:15 am

Feds earmark $30 million for Indigenous-led housing construction

Proposals must be led by Indigenous communities or organizations

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Ottawa plans to launch a new program to develop innovative and Indigenous-led housing construction in Inuit communities. (FILE PHOTO)
Ottawa plans to launch a new program to develop innovative and Indigenous-led housing construction in Inuit communities. (FILE PHOTO)

The Canadian government says it wants to hear bright ideas to help address overcrowded housing in Indigenous communities.

On Tuesday, Aug. 7, the government announced the Indigenous Homes Innovation Challenge, a new $30-million program to develop and build housing in First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.

Through this program, to be launched in fall 2018, the federal government will award a total of $30 million for new builds.

The program will involve more than three rounds of competition to spur the design and construction of Indigenous-led home and community innovation projects for First Nations, Inuit and Métis in rural and urban communities.

“From start to finish the Indigenous Homes Innovation Challenge will be led by an Indigenous steering committee, composed of seven First Nations, Métis, Inuit and urban Indigenous experts,” states a news release.

Applicants with proposals that require further development will be sent through an Innovation Lab, so they can advance their proposals and compete in a later round of prizes.

All proposals must be led by Indigenous communities or organizations and focus on improving Indigenous community well-being, the release said.

An emphasis will be placed on designs that can be replicated in other communities, among other criteria. More details can be found on the Indigenous Homes Innovation Challenge website.

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(6) Comments:

#1. Posted by Reality on August 10, 2018

The “bright idea” they seek to reduce overcrowding is the obvious one that nobody will speak. 

The problem is overpopulation.  Remote communities with limited economic opportunity that are dependent on outside support just don’t need an endlessly growing population.  As long as it does, housing will NEVER keep up, even as we endlessly throw more money and resources at the problem.

#2. Posted by Ho hum on August 10, 2018

30 billion would have been little bit better. How far can 30 million go these days?
Is it going to be for the Metis, the Inuit or the seven nations?  Canada is a very wide, vast region that has many regions of indigenous areas. Maybe they can pull raffle ticket draws to decide where.  And then hire Makivik Construction for the project, they’ll save 29 million.

#3. Posted by Colin on August 11, 2018

$30 million for all First Nations housing in Canada?

$200 million is just the initial payment from the Feds to Ontario for housing and featherbedding illegal border crossers.

Iqaluit airport on its own managed to swallow $500 million.

Like the Prime Minister said so cleverly: A Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian.

Or not?

#4. Posted by Canadian x 3 on August 13, 2018

#3 Your comment seems a little uninformed.

To start, the Feds spend about 5 billion a year on indigenous communities. Spread out a bit longer, over 7 years, the total commitment is closer to 16.5 Billion. 

The Feds committed 600 million over 2 years (2017-18) to housing, on top of 416 million already committed in 2016.

Take a look: https://www.sac-isc.gc.ca/eng/1100100010715/1521125087940

#5. Posted by sad sack on August 13, 2018

inuit distain units are flimsily made, gyoroc all around, no plywood beneath even a child could punch through though the walls. no sound proofing, “eskimos don’t mind the noise”....there is no quality to the buildings, there’s about 40% quality difference between apartment intended for gn/gnwt and social housing. so there’s a culture of who cares with social housing quality? this has been the situation since housing started in nwt/nunavut, compare “match boxes’ with gnwt units of 50 yrs ago, suspended basements are still standing, and they were made for gnwt staff housing. where are the match boxes? they are stacked up by two story and put together in five units long…

#6. Posted by angiqraq on August 14, 2018

straighten out subsidized housing and have a scale similar to public housing so there is more fairness.  Also, many of the homes have 2 high incomes and the few homeowners get $400/month taxable assistance! 
Equalize equality and the funds can be redistributed into better upkeep or additional housing.
Perhaps the GN should get out of subsidized housing all together, except for the ‘essential’ services, and provide for more homeownership programs.

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