Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut June 09, 2018 - 12:30 pm

GN issues boil water advisory for Rankin Inlet

Kivalliq community still getting cloudy tap water

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Rankin Inlet's fresh water source, Lake Nipissar, shows alarmingly low water levels in 2016. Residents of the Kivalliq community are dealing with discoloured tap water, which officials say could be mixed with mud or sand. (FILE PHOTO)
Rankin Inlet's fresh water source, Lake Nipissar, shows alarmingly low water levels in 2016. Residents of the Kivalliq community are dealing with discoloured tap water, which officials say could be mixed with mud or sand. (FILE PHOTO)
A resident of Rankin Inlet posted this image to social media last week of their bathtub filled with brown tap water. The GN has issued a boil water advisory for the community.
A resident of Rankin Inlet posted this image to social media last week of their bathtub filled with brown tap water. The GN has issued a boil water advisory for the community.

Nunavut health officials have issued a boil water advisory for residents of Rankin Inlet.

The Government of Nunavut’s Department of Health issued the alert on Thursday, June 7, calling it a “precautionary measure,” due to high turbidity levels, or cloudy water.

That means residents should boil any water they plan to consume for a full minute, including water used to cook, washing fruits and vegetables, or brushing teeth, the department said in a release.

The notice comes just weeks after residents reported brown- and yellow-coloured water flowing out of their taps.

Health and Community and Government Services have been looking into the cause of the discolouration and determined at the time that the water was safe to drink.

The GN suggested the brownish colour could come from mud or sand mixed into the water source, which is then distributed to the community via a utilidor system.

The piped system draws water from Nipissar Lake to a treatment centre on Williamson Lake before it’s distributed throughout the community.

But Nippissar Lake continues to deplete at rapid rate. York University researchers have predicted the community could even see fresh water shortages by the end of 2018.

That’s not to mention the community’s aging water infrastructure, which is now over 40 years old and has been identified by the GN as posing a number of health and safety risks.

That’s why the GN commissioned a feasibility study last year to determine what needs to be replaced or upgraded.

The results of that study should be released this summer.












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(6) Comments:

#1. Posted by Dumb Question on June 09, 2018

Why doesn’t the Hamlet plow or dump lots of the snow from around the community close to the lake so it melts into the lake?

#2. Posted by Patrick Star on June 09, 2018

Let’s take Rankin Inlet and PUSH IT somewhere else.

#3. Posted by Mariner on June 10, 2018

@#1. Probably because the Hamlet does not run the piped water system in Rankin and secondly the use of heavy equipment on this activity would quickly contaminate the water lake.

#4. Posted by Wankin Wesident on June 11, 2018

#2 I like you!

#5. Posted by Kangiq&inirmiutaq; on June 11, 2018

#1 & #3;Are these assumptions that you are both answering through or known facts? I recently spoke with a Hamlet HEO and he said that all the years that he had been working for them they have NEVER dumped any snow in the lake or near it to prevent contamination. Don’t post comments based on assumptions and make the Hamlet look bad.

#6. Posted by Dumb Comment on June 11, 2018

#5 I would suggest that you need to learn the difference between a question and an answer

(Thoughts & prayers from Poster #1)

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