Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut April 05, 2018 - 8:00 am

Missing Cape Dorset hunter found dead by searchers

Haali Tapaungai, 25, did not prepare for conditions, police say

STEVE DUCHARME
A 25-year-old man who died while hunting outside Cape Dorset did not properly prepare for weather conditions when he departed the community on March 27, the Nunavut RCMP say.
A 25-year-old man who died while hunting outside Cape Dorset did not properly prepare for weather conditions when he departed the community on March 27, the Nunavut RCMP say.

A 25-year-old man who died while hunting outside Cape Dorset did not properly prepare for weather conditions when he departed the community on March 27, the Nunavut RCMP say.

Police confirmed the hunter’s identity as Haali Tapaungai. His body was recovered near his broken-down snowmobile on March 30, after his family had reported him missing three days earlier.

A Nunavut RCMP “V” Division spokesperson, Henry Coman, said Tapaungai left Cape Dorset for the day to hunt ptarmigan, but did not pack a SPOT device, GPS, spare fuel or survival gear, and was not properly dressed.

Three search and rescue teams, along with a search plane, spotted Tapaungai’s snowmobile stuck in the snow.

“His body was found shortly thereafter,” Coman told Nunatsiaq News on Wednesday, April 4.

Coman said the death is not being treated as suspicious.

“The RCMP advises those travelling on the land to dress appropriately and to bring extra supplies,” Coman said.

“Always tell someone where you are travelling if you are going alone and when you expect to be back.”

A similar warning to prepare for journeys on the land was recently issued by the Nunavut Court of Justice, in a civil decision released last month.

In that case, an Iqaluit man, Peter Sholz, was rescued near Ward Inlet by a passing helicopter in March last year after his snowmobile ran out of gas. The vehicle was rented from a local vendor who was seeking compensation from the court for the cost of recovering the vehicle.

Sholz also did not pack a SPOT device, GPS or additional fuel.

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(2) Comments:

#1. Posted by Paul Murphy on April 06, 2018

Doesn’t look like anyone is going to comment so I will.

Firstly my heartfelt condolences to the friends and family of the deceased.

Secondly. When are these so called “hunters” going to learn to heed their own advice to others. One does not go out on the land here without the right supplies, even for a planned day trip. Food, clothing, sleeping gear, cooking equipment, extra fuel, a spot device for emergencies and if possible a sat phone. This death and those of others did not have to happen. All of the equipment is available free of charge in every community. When you go out without the proper gear, you may be putting the lives of the others at risk when they try searching for you. Please hunters, set an example for our younger hunters and be prepared for anything and save your own life.

#2. Posted by Fake Plastic Tree on April 07, 2018

#1 I think the vast majority of people already understand your point. Undoubtedly though, there are many who are reckless, careless and overestimate their skills and intuitions when on the land, and / or underestimate the risks.

To you I would ask to be careful about generalizing.

When you talk about “so called “hunters” going to learn to heed their own advice” you are grouping different types of individual into a group that should not be categorized together.

This makes your thoughts appear simplistic, unsophisticated and even condescending. For this I would bet that most people are likely to tune you out.

Also consider that your comment might produce the adverse effect of creating a corresponding generalization in return, such as “given this analysis white people are judgmental and simple minded” (assuming you are Irish, by your moniker).

Something to think about, anyway.

Have a good day.

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