Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavik May 15, 2018 - 9:30 am

Nunavik Inuit welcome move to regulate salmon harvest

Quebec government now requires visiting fishermen to hire outfitters

SARAH ROGERS
Quebec's Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks recently amended its regulations for fishing licenses to require the use of an outfitter for salmon sport-fishing in zones 23 and 24, which cover the Nunavik region. (IMAGE COURTESY OF MFFP QUEBEC)
Quebec's Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks recently amended its regulations for fishing licenses to require the use of an outfitter for salmon sport-fishing in zones 23 and 24, which cover the Nunavik region. (IMAGE COURTESY OF MFFP QUEBEC)

Nunavik’s Makivik Corp. is welcoming a recent decision by the Quebec government that now requires non-Indigenous salmon sport fishers visiting the region to use an outfitting service.

Quebec’s Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks recently amended its regulations for fishing licences to require the use of an outfitter for salmon sport-fishing in zones 23 and 24, which cover the Nunavik region.

The province has said the reason behind the move is twofold: to help protect Quebec’s Atlantic salmon—some species of which are considered of special concern under the federal Species at Risk Act—as well as to respect Nunavik’s land claim agreement.

The James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement says non-Indigenous hunters and fishermen should endeavour to use outfitters when they’re available.

“For years, Nunavik Inuit have demanded Quebec fulfill its obligations under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement by putting a stop to uncontrolled sport-fishing by non-beneficiaries who access the Inuit territory of Nunavik by float plane,” Makivik Corp. said in a May 3 news release.

“The decision to stop this practice is a step in the right direction, and we have full confidence that the minister will now take the necessary steps to implement provisions for other sport fisheries.”

The change is in place as of April 1, 2018 and will stay in place until March 2020.

It applies to zone 23, which covers the vast majority of the Nunavik region, as well as zone 24, a smaller region at the southern end of the George River, northeast of Schefferville. Salmon fishing in Nunavik is mainly focused in the southern part of the region, along the Koksoak, Whale, Leaf and George Rivers.

Quebec’s Liberal government has said the new rules will help better regulate the industry and provide better data on the harvest of salmon in the region.

But the change has also drawn criticism from Quebec’s Parti Québécois, which has argued that the new requirement creates a financial barrier for fishers visiting the region, who can pay up to $2,000 a day for outfitting services.

Email this story to a friend... Print this page... Bookmark and Share Comment on this story...

(7) Comments:

#1. Posted by pissed off on May 15, 2018

Good move under certain conditions:
That it can be enforced which means game officers in the air with the budget it needs to be effective.
That more Inuit people are hired to staff these fishing camps and benefit financially from that industry.

The flip side of that decision is that the existing owners of these camps have been benefitted tremendously by this exclusivity at the detriment of those who would like to get invloved.
It`s like have the sole license to sell gasoline along a major highway . Swell for those in place.

#2. Posted by Nunavikmiuk on May 15, 2018

Nunavik is a big place , the officers can t patrol every square mile.  Pouchers will drop in by floatplane.

#3. Posted by Walk the Talk on May 15, 2018

What are the patrol plans.  The fines?  DFO?  Not many Inuit want the DFO around.  We know what they can do.  Remember Brunt Church at year 2000.  DFO can do nasty things to native people. 

It has been very different no action sea going fish in Nunavik in regard to sport poaching by float plane.  Still Inuit have very little trust with the DFO.

#4. Posted by Johnny Mameanskum on May 15, 2018

It’s the Principle of Conservation pursuant to the JBNQA & NEQA in the management of wild fauna. It also states the land claims agreements override the Quebec Wikdlife ACT, where it contradicts the said Agreements.

Quebec undertook to have non-Native sports fisherman to use the services of Native outfitters in salmon rivers in the case of the Kosoak River; Inuit outfitters.

#5. Posted by reader on May 16, 2018

i think the inuit should be doing their own patrolling and keep an eye on Nunavik since Quebec Gov’t could be doing something behind Nunavik s’ knowledge. I, myself want to be a warden of a sort. It has been becoming a playground for poachers and who knows what in Nunavik region. Let us be more in control and it’ll be a step forward to be ready once we have our own gov’t.

#6. Posted by Vroom1999@hotmail.com on May 16, 2018

Hope it won’t pass and I believe it won’t. Those mesures are only to get richer 3 Inuks families already rich by their participation in Nunavik outfitters and of course friends of Liberal party. Think twice, lot of people working up to the beautiful region of Nunavik is for living few salmon fishing trip by paying Landholding fees (if applicable), provincial permit, salmon permits and a boat from local. Hmmm, really not sure that’s a good deal!

#7. Posted by Nunavimiu on May 16, 2018

How many Inuit owned outfitters is there that have a enterprise number and is actually on the Nunavik Inuit business registry?

Perhaps this will help a local business thrive bring economic independence to Nunavimmiut.

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?