Nunavut coroner to do mandatory inquest on death of baby in care

Infant, aged four months, died while in the custody of Family Services

By NUNATSIAQ NEWS

A four-month-old baby who was in the care of the Department of Family Services arrived unresponsive at Iqaluit's hospital July 29, where the infant was pronounced dead. The Office of the Coroner in Nunavut will now do a mandatory inquest under section 21 of the Coroners Act. (FILE PHOTO)


A four-month-old baby who was in the care of the Department of Family Services arrived unresponsive at Iqaluit’s hospital July 29, where the infant was pronounced dead. The Office of the Coroner in Nunavut will now do a mandatory inquest under section 21 of the Coroners Act. (FILE PHOTO)

The Office of the Chief Coroner will do an inquest into the July 29 death of a Nunavut baby who was in the care of the Department of Family Services, the coroner’s office said Aug. 21.

The baby, Amelia Annie Keyoota, aged four months, was pronounced dead at the Qikiqtani General Hospital July 29 after an ambulance brought her there, the Nunavut RCMP said last month.

Police were called to the hospital that day just after 4:30 p.m., at some point after the baby died.

“The infant at the time of death was in care of the Department of Family Services; the infant was discovered to be unresponsive and not breathing and was transported by EMS to the hospital and was pronounced deceased,” the Nunavut chief coroner, Padma Suramala, said in a statement.

At the time, police announced no arrests.

Neither the Government of Nunavut, the RCMP or the coroner’s office have stated why the baby was in the custody of Family Services, where the baby was in custody, or who was responsible for the baby’s care on the day she died.

Under section 21 of the Nunavut Coroners Act, it’s mandatory for the coroner to hold an inquest into the death of a person in the involuntary custody of an institution.

The purpose of a coroner’s inquest is to determine the cause of a death and to make recommendations aimed at preventing similar deaths in the future, but not to find fault.

Share This Story

(0) Comments