Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut March 13, 2018 - 11:30 am

Iqaluit photo exhibit celebrates women and their families

Exhibition opens at Iqaluit museum

Trina Qaqqaq views
Trina Qaqqaq views "Smile with Tuktu Heads" by Rankin Inlet's Shelly Kingmeatok, during the opening of the photo exhibition at the museum in Iqaluit March 10. (PHOTO BY BETH BROWN)

Iqaluit’s Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum is showcasing an exhibition of photographs entered into the annual competition held by Qulliit Nunavut Status of Women Council.

The theme of the exhibition, which opened on Saturday, March 10, is “celebrating women and their families.” The images include a 10-year-old girl and the first beluga she’s harpooned, girls enjoying a snack of pieces of caribou head, children sliding on sealskins to help their mother by cleaning and softening them, and a woman’s hand holding an ulu.

As well as showcasing the artistic talent of Nunavummiut, the executive director of Qulliit, Beth Beattie, told Nunatsiaq News that the competition is “a positive way of reminding people to think about women and their families,” because women in the territory have important concerns for both themselves and their families about poverty, homelessness, violence and health.

She added that people outside the city often comment that events only happen in Iqaluit, so Qulliit tries to make it easy for people from all over the territory to participate in the photo competition.

They just need to send in digital images, then Beattie has them printed and framed. This year more than 30 entries were received from all three regions of the territory. That’s a smaller number than in previous years.

The 10 prize-winning photos will be chosen later this month at the annual face-to-face meeting of Qulliit, which will be held this year in Rankin Inlet.

The exhibition continues at the museum in Iqaluit until April 1.

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(1) Comments:

#1. Posted by R. P. DWYER, GJOA HAVEN. on March 13, 2018

Many years ago, in the early 1970’s I had a conversation with a man
called Dave Turner, who had come North to the Keewatin in the 1920’s
  He reckoned that Inuit men had it easy compared to Inuit women.
We had a really good conversation, by coincidence we were both
born in Paisley, Scotland.
The work load of Inuit women was unbelievable in the old days.
Making clothing, cooking, looking after small children, and all in
primitive freezing conditions.  Awesome ladies.

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