Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut February 10, 2018 - 3:30 pm

The week in good news: Feb. 3 to Feb. 10

Nunavut educator named one of Canada's 40 outstanding principals

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Good news for Nunavut Sivuniksavut, where students, staff, board members and visiting dignitaries celebrated the news that the Ottawa-based Nunavut college program has secured a new residence complex for its students on Feb. 1. NS is now the owner of a three-building complex (right) that will house students starting in September 2018. Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Nunasi Corp. and the NCC Investment Group Inc. all contributed to the new facility. (PHOTOS COURTESY OF NS)
Good news for Nunavut Sivuniksavut, where students, staff, board members and visiting dignitaries celebrated the news that the Ottawa-based Nunavut college program has secured a new residence complex for its students on Feb. 1. NS is now the owner of a three-building complex (right) that will house students starting in September 2018. Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Nunasi Corp. and the NCC Investment Group Inc. all contributed to the new facility. (PHOTOS COURTESY OF NS)

In a week marked by a number of disturbing news stories, about assaults, deaths and criminal trials, stories highlighting the achievements of people in Nunavut and Nunavik also stood out.

First, a Nunavut teacher was named as one of Canada’s outstanding principals.

Rebecca Hainnu, the principal of Quluaq School in Clyde River, is one of 40 educators on the list of Canada’s outstanding principals, named by the Learning Partnership.

“Rebecca models compassion and resilience for staff and students. Her door is open and she is visible in the community, sharing her vision for improved student achievement and welcoming input and support. Rebecca is now recognized in her own community, region, territory and beyond, as a phenomenal, outstanding educator,” said a release on her selection as an outstanding principal.

Then, the Juno awards committee said that three Nunavut performers are now in the running for Juno awards.

The Jerry Cans picked up two Juno nominations, one for breakthrough group of the year, and the other for best contemporary roots album for the group’s Inuusiq album.

A previous Juno winner, Cambridge Bay-raised throat singer Tanya Tagaq, received a nomination for her latest album, Retribution, in the category of best alternative album.

First-time nominee Kelly Fraser, a Sanikiluaq-based singer-songwriter, is nominated for best Indigenous music album for her second album, Sedna.

The Juno awards will be announced March 26 at a gala in Vancouver.

In Ottawa, last week many northern talents were also on display at the Northern Lights 2018 conference, where Nunavik seamstress Winnifred Nungak spoke to Nunatsiaq News about her creations, which she sells under her business, Winnifred Designs.

Arnold Witzig and Sima Sharifi, the Vancouver philanthropists who are the driving force behind the multi-million-dollar prize that funds different Arctic initiatives, spoke to Nunatsiaq News about their life experiences and just why they wanted to launch the prize in 2012.

The pair was relatively unknown, but on Jan. 31, at the Northern Lights gala event, where the prize winners were announced, the estimated 1,500 northerners attending the Ottawa gala thanked them with teary eyes and thunderous applause.

And another top good-news story, according to Google Analytics which tracks traffic on Nunatsiaqonline.ca, was of interest to many in Nunavut: SSi Micro spilled the details on its new Nunavut cellphone plan, which will see service plans starting at $25 per month, with no long-distance fees within Nunavut.

One feature, which the company is calling a “game-changer,” is that all calls within Nunavut will be treated as local, without long-distance fees. “We’ve always treated Nunavut as one community,” said their CEO, Jeff Philipp.

A happy moment: MPs applaud Nunavik MP Romeo Saganash on Thursday, Feb. 8, as his private member’s bill, C-262, which would require the federal government to ensure all Canadian laws are consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, passes second reading in the House of Commons and heads into the standing committee on Indigenous and northern affairs. The UNDRIP declaration recognizes the basic human rights of Indigenous peoples, including rights to self-determination, lands and languages. The document is considered a key tool in helping Indigenous groups fight discrimination and marginalization in their home countries, although it’s not legally binding. Before being elected in 2015, the federal Liberal government campaigned on a promise to implement UNDRIP. (SCREEN SHOT)
A happy moment: MPs applaud Nunavik MP Romeo Saganash on Thursday, Feb. 8, as his private member’s bill, C-262, which would require the federal government to ensure all Canadian laws are consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, passes second reading in the House of Commons and heads into the standing committee on Indigenous and northern affairs. The UNDRIP declaration recognizes the basic human rights of Indigenous peoples, including rights to self-determination, lands and languages. The document is considered a key tool in helping Indigenous groups fight discrimination and marginalization in their home countries, although it’s not legally binding. Before being elected in 2015, the federal Liberal government campaigned on a promise to implement UNDRIP. (SCREEN SHOT)
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