Two Iqaluit residents awarded Fulbright Arctic Initiative grants

Sean Guistini from NAC and Gwen Healey from Qaujigiartiit centre among 16 circumpolar recipients

By NUNATSIAQ NEWS

Sean Guistini, the manager of Nunavut Arctic College Media in Iqaluit, will spend the next 18 months on a Fulbright Arctic Initiative research project. (HANDOUT PHOTO)


Sean Guistini, the manager of Nunavut Arctic College Media in Iqaluit, will spend the next 18 months on a Fulbright Arctic Initiative research project. (HANDOUT PHOTO)

Gwen Healey, the co-founder and executive and scientific director of the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, is one of 16 circumpolar researchers to receive a Fulbright Arctic Initiative research fellowship.  (HANDOUT PHOTO)


Gwen Healey, the co-founder and executive and scientific director of the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, is one of 16 circumpolar researchers to receive a Fulbright Arctic Initiative research fellowship. (HANDOUT PHOTO)

Two Iqaluit residents have received Fulbright Arctic Initiative grants that will allow them to spend the next 18 months on research projects sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

Sean Guistini of Nunavut Arctic College and Gwen Healey of the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre are among 16 new appointees from around the circumpolar world who will explore public policy research questions and innovative solutions, a news release on the awards said on Tuesday, March 3.

Guistini is the manager of Nunavut Arctic College Media, established in April 2015 to create learning resources for Nunavummiut and others with interest in Inuit and Arctic histories, cultures and languages.

NAC Media’s work includes book publishing, film production, oral history documentation and digital archiving.

For his project, Guistini will focus on digital archives to support cultural preservation, teaching, research, resource and policy development, governance and repatriation.

He plans to look into such issues as ownership rights, accessibility platforms, digital repatriation and frameworks for community and kin consultation.

Healey, co-founder and executive and scientific director of the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, who was born and raised in the city, holds a master’s degree in epidemiology and community health sciences from the University of Calgary and a PhD in public health from the University of Toronto.

For her research, she will continue to look into health issues. Healey said her research for the Fulbright grant will focus on “trauma and reconciliation and reconnecting our communities with photos and narratives from the past.”

“I’ll be visiting the Steffanson Archives at Dartmouth, which contain more than 1,200 photos and narratives from the North, and my goal is to bring copies of Nunavut-specific information back to the territory to develop into learning resources for students and a public exhibit,” Healey said in an email.

She and Guistini will also participate in a series of three seminar meetings and a Fulbright exchange experience with the others in the program—who come from the U.S., Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia and Sweden—with the goal of building a network for more international Arctic collaboration.

Share This Story

(0) Comments