Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut April 10, 2018 - 11:40 am

What you read on Nunatsiaq.com from April 1 to April 8

The death of a Mountie in a snowmobile mishap leads the week’s news

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Our top-shared image on Facebook from April 1 to April 8: This old two-dollar bill features an engraving based on a photograph taken near Pond Inlet in 1951 by author and filmmaker Doug Wilkinson. Historian Kenn Harper shared the bittersweet memories evoked by this version of the bill in his most recent column. (IMAGE COURTESY OF KENN HARPER)
Our top-shared image on Facebook from April 1 to April 8: This old two-dollar bill features an engraving based on a photograph taken near Pond Inlet in 1951 by author and filmmaker Doug Wilkinson. Historian Kenn Harper shared the bittersweet memories evoked by this version of the bill in his most recent column. (IMAGE COURTESY OF KENN HARPER)
Also widely shared by our readers over the past week: A doll by Nunavik artist and dollmaker Elisapee Inukpuk, who recently died in Puvirnituq. Inukpuk was born in 1938 in Sarollie’s camp along the Hudson coast near Inukjuak, and she developed a signature style of making dolls that depicted Inuit women’s everyday activities, like drying skins or stretching kamiks. (FILE PHOTOS)
Also widely shared by our readers over the past week: A doll by Nunavik artist and dollmaker Elisapee Inukpuk, who recently died in Puvirnituq. Inukpuk was born in 1938 in Sarollie’s camp along the Hudson coast near Inukjuak, and she developed a signature style of making dolls that depicted Inuit women’s everyday activities, like drying skins or stretching kamiks. (FILE PHOTOS)

Saturday’s news that a snowmobile accident claimed the life of an off-duty RCMP officer outside of Kugluktuk proved to be top-read story on Nunatsiaq.com between April 1 and April 8.

The incident occurred in a well-known area called Bloody Falls, in Kugluk Territorial Park, where the Coppermine River flows through a narrow gorge about 13 kilometres southwest of Kugluktuk, the westernmost community in Nunavut, with a population of about 1,500.

On Sunday, community members and RCMP officers lay flowers near the Kugluktuk RCMP detachment in memory of the deceased member.

The RCMP has not yet released the identity of the dead officer.

Another top story over the past week dealt with the upcoming June sentencing of a Rankin Inlet man for sexual interference with a minor.

Norman Ford, 64, pleaded guilty to the charge in February. That same month, another victim of Ford’s went public with her story of abuse.

Susan Aglukark, a well-known Nunavut singer and songwriter, testified before the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in February while the commission hosted hearings in Rankin Inlet.

In her testimony, Aglukark recounted the time, at age eight, when Ford invited her over and then sexually molested her in a bedroom.

More than a decade after her assault, Ford was charged with molesting other victims, and Aglukark gave testimony to help convict him. He received an 18-month sentence, of which he served six months.

Another widely read story looks at the break-in at Baker Lake’s Rachel Arngnammaktiq Elementary School over the Easter long weekend, when someone broke doors and windows, stole about $1,000 in cash, and took video surveillance equipment.

The smashed windows prompted the school’s closure for a day, but school staff were able to clean up the mess quickly enough for students to return the following day.

No suspects have been named yet in connection with the break-in, and police say their investigation continues.

Other top-read stories include:

• A spirited exchange in our letters to the editor section, in which Jordan Ipirq Bens asks why Iqaluit’s Frobisher Inn doesn’t do more to offer services in the Inuit language, followed by a response from Ed Romanowski, the president of Nunastar.

• A story about how a 25-year-old Cape Dorset man died from exposure while hunting, after his snowmobile broke down. RCMP say he didn’t properly prepare for the weather conditions.

• Our April Fools Day spoof story about the discovery of the remains of a gigantic bunny rabbit that once roamed the High Arctic.

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