Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Around the Arctic June 02, 2018 - 2:30 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaq.com from May 20 to May 27

Preliminary inquiry in case of woman accused of murdering her child leads the news

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: Paul Quassa, then president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. and presently Nunavut's premier, and Brian Mulroney, then Canada's prime minister, sign the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement at a much-remembered ceremony held 25 years ago, on May 25, 1993, at Inuksuk High School in Iqaluit. The NLCA, along with the Nunavut Act, sped through Parliament that spring with all-party support, triggering the processes that led to the implementation of the NLCA, as well as the creation of Nunavut on April 1, 1999. Each Nunavut community will receive $5,000 to celebrate this date, Quassa said in the Nunavut legislature on May 25. (FILE PHOTO)
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: Paul Quassa, then president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. and presently Nunavut's premier, and Brian Mulroney, then Canada's prime minister, sign the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement at a much-remembered ceremony held 25 years ago, on May 25, 1993, at Inuksuk High School in Iqaluit. The NLCA, along with the Nunavut Act, sped through Parliament that spring with all-party support, triggering the processes that led to the implementation of the NLCA, as well as the creation of Nunavut on April 1, 1999. Each Nunavut community will receive $5,000 to celebrate this date, Quassa said in the Nunavut legislature on May 25. (FILE PHOTO)

The most-read story on Nunatsiaq.com over the past week describes the case of a Nunavut woman accused of killing one of her children and injuring two others.

The charges she faces include one count of second degree murder and two counts of attempted murder in an incident involving her three children. These charges were not contested during the case’s preliminary inquiry.

Her case now goes to assignment court at the Nunavut Court of Justice in Iqaluit on June 4 at 1:30 p.m. A trial date, possibly in the woman’s home community, located somewhere in Nunavut, could be discussed at that time.

Justice Bonnie Tulloch placed a strict publication ban on future coverage that prevents the name of the accused and her community from being reported.

The publication ban for the case came into effect May 23, and does not apply to previous media coverage.

The second most-read story of the past week, based on numbers from Google Analytics, which tracks online readership, concerned the death of two Iqaluit residents who died Sunday, May 27, after a violent incident on Nikku Lane, behind the Northwestel building. They died as the result of an apparent murder-suicide, information released from the Nunavut RCMP suggests.

Witnesses reported they saw a man with a knife chase a woman on Nikku Lane at about 6 a.m. that morning, police said.

The man stabbed the woman and then stabbed himself. The couple “succumbed to their injuries” at the Qikiqtani General Hospital.

“Our thoughts are with the families during this difficult time and grief counsellors have been made available through the Nunavut crisis response and trauma teams,” police said.

Also among the top five stories:

•  A fundraising campaign has been launched so Yugh Ahuja, 17, a newcomer to the Nunavut capital from New Delhi, can see a performance by his favourite actor and Bollywood star, Salman Khan. in Vancouver.

Ahuja’s parents, supported by Inuksuk High School and the Iqaluit District Education Authority, have started a GoFundMe page and will be doing 50-50 raffles in the coming months to raise $8,000, to help pay for Ahuja’s plane ticket to that concert and to raise money for Ahuja to attend summer camp on his own in Toronto. Ahuja suffers from a severe type of degenerative disease for which there is no cure, called Duchenne muscular dystrophy, or DMD.

Nunavut Premier Paul Quassa responded to a Nunatsiaq News editorial, saying “I was disappointed to read your criticism of our government’s new mandate, Turaaqtavut, and your assessment that the government has been silent on key issues.”

Police have determined that a Nunavik girl’s 2017 death can be considered accidental: Alacie Inukpuk, 11, was found frozen to death in Umiujaq last October. Inukpuk died of hypothermia, but the girl had also been drinking alcohol. The investigation, led by the Sûreté du Québec provincial police, continued for months, although police said they weren’t investigating any criminal element.

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(3) Comments:

#1. Posted by RD on June 02, 2018

The story of social illness is accurate - slums, addiction, violence and suicide - but the promoted causes and solutions aren’t. To see Nunavut, view the corrupt society entrenched in each community and the legislature.

Inuit of multi-generational power with influence, jobs and education have abused their positions for decades. The oppressed resist by violence to themselves, each other and their children, through alcohol and drugs, emotional dependency, compliance, suicide and vandalism. The oppressors call for more funding (to distribute among themselves widen the gap with the weak) and for return to ancient culture (to enshrine myths akin to the emperor’s new clothes)

Just four generations has created a society sustained by tyranny, poverty, addiction, unemployability and despair and beset with sickening levels of wastage and sloth. It’s organized crime at its worst and is protected by a cloak of sensitivity and unwarranted guilt by its patrons.

#2. Posted by Frank on June 03, 2018

Undoutedly. Well put. Add in self entitlement, lack of focus, despair, southern hires come to fill the positions of the uneducated and in some cases are part of the abuse perpetuated towards the oppressed and within the system itself, enough distinct organizations at the trough seeking limited dollars to uphold some long lost cultural values. Generationally sucker punched.

#3. Posted by george on June 04, 2018

The cat is out of the bag. I mean whats the government going to do. Eradicate all vestiges of the purported white devil colonialism? Call Nunavut a distinct society? This is not Quebec by any stretch of the imagination. The next generation will decide and trust me they wont be speaking Inuktituk.

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