Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Around the Arctic October 05, 2018 - 3:30 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaq.com from Sept. 23 to Sept. 30

Family camps out to protest “hidden homelessness”

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
This photograph was particularly popular on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page last week, or maybe it was the thought of being able to take longer showers that pleased readers: The City of Iqaluit’s water reservoir at Lake Geraldine has been replenished, thanks to efforts that began in mid-August to pump water from Apex River. A dry summer and growing demand had led to worries that the city may not have enough drinking water to last through the winter. That prompted the city to strike a task force and approve the pumping operations. (PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ALEXANDER)
This photograph was particularly popular on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page last week, or maybe it was the thought of being able to take longer showers that pleased readers: The City of Iqaluit’s water reservoir at Lake Geraldine has been replenished, thanks to efforts that began in mid-August to pump water from Apex River. A dry summer and growing demand had led to worries that the city may not have enough drinking water to last through the winter. That prompted the city to strike a task force and approve the pumping operations. (PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ALEXANDER)

The most-read story on Nunatsiaq.com last week concerned a family in Iqaluit who pitched a tent in the grounds of the legislature when they say they ran out of couch-surfing options.

Brian Tagalik and Pitsiula Ashoona want to send the message that Inuit are not being prioritized when it comes to public and staff housing—and that needs to change.

Tagalik has been staying home to care for the couple’s daughters, while Ashoona has been working in relief and casual positions for the Government of Nunavut for years.

These short-term contracts meant she wasn’t eligible for staff housing.

Only 377 out of 1,420, or 26.5 per cent, of government staff employees who receive staff housing are Inuit from Nunavut, according to statistics released by the Department of Finance in late June.

The family says they’ve been on the waiting list for public housing for about four years. But because they left Nunavut for nine months at one point, their wait had to start over again when they returned.

The second most-read story was about a passenger who mistakenly boarded a First Air flight in Yellowknife that was going to Cambridge Bay, when his destination was Fort Simpson in the Northwest Territories.

Flights left Yellowknife for a number of destinations over the course of an hour on Wednesday, Sept. 26: Iqaluit, Gjoa Haven, Cambridge Bay … and Fort Simpson.

Employees from First Air were processing check-ins from two small counters located by Gate 4, close to the terminal’s busy restaurant concessions, with no placards to announce which flights were being boarded.

Meanwhile, a least four aircraft of varying sizes were on the tarmac outside Gate 4, and it wasn’t clear which aircraft was going where.

Fortunately, an announcement that was made before takeoff alerted the passenger that he was on the wrong flight. He hastily disembarked.

Also among the top five stories:

• Nunavut’s coroner’s office is investigating the in-custody death of a 22-year-old Kugluktuk man. The man, whose identity had not been released, died in Yellowknife on Sept. 19, after being medevaced there from the western Nunavut community. That medical flight followed an incident that occurred while the man was held in police custody in Kugluktuk.

An Iqaluit woman has been charged with the abduction of her own two children. An Iqaluit man contacted the Iqaluit RCMP detachment to report the disappearance of his two children on Saturday, Sept. 22. Police can’t identify the woman in order to protect the children’s privacy. “However, we can confirm the children’s whereabouts are known and the children are not in danger,” RCMP said.

• The community of Cambridge Bay grieves for a Grade 8 student at Kiilinik High School who died on Monday, Sept. 24, after he had been found that morning, unresponsive, cold and intoxicated, in a cabin that he and two other teenagers had broken into.

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(3) Comments:

#1. Posted by Homelessness on October 07, 2018

This is just wrong that Inuit, in their own land, cannot be prioritized for housing.

Casual Contracts are being severely abused, issued one after the other - the Union should be on this!

I know people who have had five, six or seven Casual Contracts and this is workplace abuse!

Come on now, house this family and stop so many Casual Contracts.

#2. Posted by Homey, Homey. ( Rankin Inlet ) on October 09, 2018

I am Inuit and having your own home on your own land, unless it is an
  igloo, is nothing to do with it ! !
I have worked in Nunavut locations for many years, and if people
choose to have drugs, gambling, and alcohol, instead of looking
after their families, that is there own fault.
No one interested in birth control ? Buy nourishing food?
  Why are our leaders not taking an active part in helping our people?
Maybe they could buy us all snow knives?

#3. Posted by Kanuwhipit on October 11, 2018

#2 if you were Inuk, you would put Inuk and not Inuit. The usual stereotypes in your comments as well so I know you are not an Inuk.

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