Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavut April 05, 2018 - 9:30 am

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from March 25 to April 1

Okaliraaluk discovery leads the week's news

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The top photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares: Inuit students from Ottawa’s Nunavut Sivuniksavut college program dance during a pro-sealing rally on Parliament Hill on Wednesday, March 28. The protest featured guest speakers, a seal-skin fashion show, performances of traditional Inuit songs and dancing, and throat-singing. (PHOTO COURTESY OF ITK)
The top photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares: Inuit students from Ottawa’s Nunavut Sivuniksavut college program dance during a pro-sealing rally on Parliament Hill on Wednesday, March 28. The protest featured guest speakers, a seal-skin fashion show, performances of traditional Inuit songs and dancing, and throat-singing. (PHOTO COURTESY OF ITK)

In an otherwise grim week of news, an April Fools story hopped to the top of the week’s most-read stories on Nunatsiaq.com.

The tale related how Canadian researchers had found fossilized bone fragments that reveal the existence of a giant nine-foot hare, dubbed okaliraaluk (big bad bunny) that once hopped its way around Ellesmere Island.

That story provided some levity in a week that otherwise included reporting on the death of an Arctic Bay man, which was the second most-read story online, according to Google Analytics which tracks online website traffic.

Andrew Muckpaloo, 30, was charged in connection with the death of the Arctic Bay man who succumbed March 26 to injuries at the community’s health centre.

Muckpaloo faces a charge of murder, along with one count of assault and one count of breaching probation.

The RCMP did not state whether the charge is first or second degree murder, but Muckpaloo will remain in custody until he appears April 10 at the Nunavut Court of Justice in Iqaluit.

Then, the City of Iqaluit learned March 22 it must pay a $69,000 fine for Safety Act breachesthat led to municipal worker James Dorrington being crushed by a garbage truck on April 18, 2016. Three men who were city employees at the time—Joseph Brown, Keith Baines and Ben Kovic Jr.—must also pay fines of $3,450, $2,300 and $1,150 respectively.

The injured worker, James Dorrington, sat in the Nunavut Court of Justice as the guilty pleas were read, telling senior judge Neil Sharkey in his victim impact statement that “my life changed forever as a result of my accident.”

Following the recommendations of lawyers who reached the plea deal, Sharkey imposed a $69,000 fine on the City, including a 15-per-cent victim surcharge.

That money will be paid to the Workers’ Safety and Compensation Commission, for a fund intended for additional safety training in Iqaluit and Nunavut.

Also among the top stories of the week:

Red tape keeps paralyzed Inuk broke in Cuba: Insurance companies won’t pay hospital bill because Napu Boychuk stayed overseas.

A Clyde River standoff ended with the arrest of distraught Nunavut man March 27 after a lengthy period of negotiation. Scott Qillaq, 26, has been charged with aggravated assault, choking to overcome resistance, assault, uttering threats and failure to comply with a probation order. Now in custody, he is set to appear in court again April 10 at the Nunavut Court of Justice.

 

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