Nunatsiaq News
FEATURES July 11, 2018 - 7:40 am

Gjoa Haven Inuit ready to keep watch over national historic site

Betty Kogvik adds to her family stories as Franklin guardian

BETH BROWN

Betty Kogvik’s mother was raised near Terror Bay, where her grandfather worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company.

This summer the Gjoa Haven woman will visit that bay in her newfound role as a guardian of the ill-fated Franklin shipwrecks, the HMS Erebus and Terror, which rest roughly 125 km outside...

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FEATURES May 09, 2018 - 1:30 pm

Archived photographs help to return an Inuk gaze

"There was a real sense that the camera was a colonial tool"

SARAH ROGERS

A black and white photograph depicts an Inuk man and woman in traditional clothing, with the snow on the tundra behind them lit up by the sun.

Something almost seems out of place: the hunter in the photo is wearing a Kodak Duaflex camera around his neck.

The man is Joseph Idlout, and what few...

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FEATURES May 08, 2018 - 10:30 am

Nunavik Sivunitsavut’s all-female grad group learns and bonds

“We’re like a family here”

COURTNEY EDGAR

MONTREAL—As a single mother, Mary Saunders used to do her homework at night when her daughter was asleep.

The 24-year-old Nunavik Sivunitsavut student from Kuujjuaq remembered how she would whisper with her roommate after dark when studying, so as not to wake the sleeping children.

Roommates and...

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FEATURES May 05, 2018 - 1:00 pm

Inuk artist offers new twists on traditional hunting and fishing tools

Couzyn van Heuvelen is the third Inuit artist to be nominated for the Sobey Art Award

JOHN THOMPSON

Couzyn van Heuvelen is best known as the Inuk artist who creates oversized, tin-foil party balloons that are made to resemble avataqs—the inflatable sealskin floats traditionally used by Inuit hunters to track and tire marine mammals.

He’s also created giant, five-foot-tall fishing lures that...

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FEATURES May 04, 2018 - 3:30 pm

New Iqaluit-produced children’s show offers Inuit entertainment, education

"It's like a Sesame Street, but in Inuktitut"

SARAH ROGERS

If you have young children who are up early on Saturday mornings, send them to start their day in Anaana’s Tent.

The new children’s series, produced by Iqaluit-based Taqqut Productions, is offering a half hour of preschool-focused entertainment and education, through live-action performances,...

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FEATURES May 03, 2018 - 11:30 am

Nunavik graphic artist turns talents toward inspiring students

"I want to open their minds, see what there is and develop things"

JANE GEORGE

Living in a remote and tiny Arctic community, like Ivujivik on Nunavik’s Hudson Strait, might seem limiting to some people.

But not to graphic designer Thomassie Mangiok, who is also the centre director for Ivujivik’s Nuvviti school, which serves the roughly 120 children living in this community...

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FEATURES April 28, 2018 - 11:30 am

What climate change means to the Arctic’s creepy crawlies

Warmer weather is changing the composition of critters in Greenland’s tundra

JOHN THOMPSON

The springtail is not one of your better-known Arctic creatures. The small, wingless insect gets its name from how it uses its rigid tail to catapult itself into the air and out of harm’s way.

The springtail also has a neat trick to help survive freezing during long Arctic winters. It manages to...

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FEATURES April 28, 2018 - 9:30 am

Better food, vitamins could help curb TB in Nunavut: researcher

"Widespread malnutrition … among Nunavut’s TB patients is a major challenge towards Canada’s goal for TB elimination"

JANE GEORGE

Here’s a simple, cost-effective proposal to reduce Nunavut’s sky-high rates of tuberculosis: give vitamin pills and more fresh food to people who suffer from the disease or are at risk of contracting it.

That’s the approach recommended by Khushwant S. Bhullar, a graduate student at the University...

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FEATURES April 26, 2018 - 10:45 am

Reporting sexual abuse in Nunavut: why and how to do it

“It’s time to talk about it"

SARAH ROGERS

So far into 2018, a handful of Nunavummiut may have become household names in the territory—for all the wrong reasons.

Susan Aglukark made a stunning public disclosure of childhood abuse at the hearings of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in February, ......

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FEATURES April 24, 2018 - 10:29 am

Ottawa Inuit program uses Jeopardy with a sexy twist

Monthly event teaches sex education, harm reduction

COURTNEY EDGAR

Special to Nunatsiaq News

From what the Bs stand for in “STBBI” to how peeing in public can be regarded as exhibitionism in Canadian law, Jennisha Wilson of the Alluriarniq program at Tungasuvvingat Inuit is making adult sex education not just accessible, but also fun.

On Wednesday, Wilson hosted...

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FEATURES April 20, 2018 - 7:59 am

Cuppa Joe and a new place to go: hip café comes to Iqaluit

Chef sees need for niche java shop in Nunavut capital

BETH BROWN

Coffee beans are really seeds, found in the centre of a small red fruit that looks kind of like a cranberry.

It’s that centre—and the dark colour of the caffeine-bearing liquid fuel the beans brew up—that inspired the name of Iqaluit’s hip new coffee joint: Black Heart Café.

“Iqaluit needed...

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FEATURES April 19, 2018 - 10:30 am

A tale of two Nunavut arts communities, and youth working together

"Art is a very good tool for self-expression”

SARAH ROGERS

Rhoda Nashalik and Tasha Partridge said they were really nervous.

The 13-year-old Grade 7 and Grade 8 students from Pangnirtung were in Cape Dorset for the first time, to spend the week with a group of junior high students on the other side of Baffin Island.

They were among seven students from...

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FEATURES April 18, 2018 - 3:30 pm

Northern lights shine south in Toronto outdoor exhibit

“The best thing is when you can see artwork in the lights"

SARAH ROGERS

The only lights you can usually see when you look skyward in Canada’s largest city are those left on in office towers at night.

But until the end of May, people in Toronto can enjoy the northern lights and learn a bit of Inuit folklore right from the city’s downtown core.

A new installation by...

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FEATURES April 14, 2018 - 1:00 pm

Scientists stumble upon super-salty lakes beneath Nunavut glaciers

Unusual discovery may offer insights into extraterrestrial life

NUNATSIAQ NEWS

Researchers studying Nunavut’s Devon Ice Cap have made a surprising discovery: beneath more than half a kilometre of ice lie two super-salty lakes.

They’re the first lakes of this kind to be found beneath glaciers. And scientists hope the unusual conditions created in these water bodies may give...

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FEATURES April 09, 2018 - 1:29 pm

Alaskan Inupiaq poet named first Indigenous Guggenheim fellow in poetry

"I hope that the creative work I can undertake in the future contributes to the assertion, not the desertion, of our identities"

JANE GEORGE

The acclaimed Inupiaq Alaskan poet Joan Naviyuk Kane plans to spend the next year researching and writing a new collection of poems, called Dark Traffic, with a big goal: to redefine how people look at the Arctic and Indigenous people.

Kane will be able to work on this new collection of poems...

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FEATURES April 07, 2018 - 10:30 am

Meet the Louis Armstrongs of the Arctic Ocean

“We heard hours and hours and hours of singing from these whales, from November up until early April.”

JOHN THOMPSON

Bowhead whales, it turns out, are the jazz singers of the ocean.

That’s the conclusion of Kate Stafford, an oceanographer with the University of Washington, who has been studying the singing of bowhead whales off the northeast coast of Greenland with the help of underwater microphones.

Her latest...

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FEATURES April 03, 2018 - 7:59 am

Nunavik podcast an open forum to talk about sex—and much more

“We need to be able to protect ourselves, but others as well"

SARAH ROGERS

A group of Nunavimmiut youth sit around a table chatting about one of the region’s biggest taboos—sex and sexual health.

Kuujjuaq youth leader Olivia Ikey recalls making an appointment to see a sexual health nurse at the community’s health centre and compares the experience of waiting to see the...

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FEATURES April 01, 2018 - 8:00 am

APRIL FOOLS! Researchers find evidence of giant, prehistoric Arctic bunny

Dubbed "ukaliraaluk," creature may have stood nine feet tall

JANE GEORGE

Canadian researchers revealed stunning new evidence yesterday that raises questions about the evolution of mammals on Earth: fossilized bone fragments that reveal the existence of a giant nine-foot hare that once hopped its way around Ellesmere Island.

“We can’t be certain about the colour of this...

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FEATURES March 24, 2018 - 10:45 am

Art curator digs into history of traditional Inuit needle cases

“If we’re not passing along our knowledge, it’s lost”

PATRICIA LIGHTFOOT

When Krista Ulujuk Zawadski came across a collection of Inuit containers for sewing needles, also called kakpiit, from the 1800s, she wondered why, when growing up in Rankin Inlet, she had never heard of these unassuming little objects that were once vital to Inuit survival.

Zawadski, who is now...

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FEATURES March 13, 2018 - 3:30 pm

Northern style: parka exhibit decks out Nunavut legislature

Nunavummiut know a thing or two about cold-weather fashion

BETH BROWN

You might think the small seal- and caribou-skin parkas hung in the entrance hall of the Nunavut legislature this month belong to an earlier time—but they were actually worn by the children of Iqaluit resident Matty McNair, who curated the legislature’s new Inuit parka exhibit. 

Three “North...

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FEATURES March 07, 2018 - 3:30 pm

Country food key to nutrition in Nunavut, dietitian says

Fruits from the sea your best bet for vitamin D

BETH BROWN

Feeling low on energy Numavummiut? Maybe you’re in need of some extra vitamin D or a boost to your iron levels?

If so, then filling up on country foods like caribou, char and maqtaq could help you out, Iqaluit Public Health dietitian Madonna Achkar said.

“Caribou is rich in iron which is a...

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FEATURES February 20, 2018 - 1:40 pm

All in the family: new children’s book shows Nunavut family diversity

“It’s reflective of life in Nunavut and the different families that you see”

BETH BROWN

In Nunavut, the “nuclear family”— meaning mom, dad and 1.5 kids—isn’t the only norm.

That’s why Kerry McCluskey and Jesse Unaapik Mike dreamed up their new Inhabit Media book, titled Families, so that children from different family makeups would know that every kind of family is the right...

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FEATURES February 07, 2018 - 1:30 pm

Nunavik seamstress embellishes tradition

“We all grew up watching our mothers and grandmothers, so it’s in our DNA"

SARAH ROGERS

OTTAWA—In a sea of sealskin and colourful commander fabric, Winifred Nungak’s booth stands out for its pop of pink, from plush pompoms to dyed fox-fur mittens.

The Kangirsuk seamstress has curated a booth at this year’s Northern Lights Business and Cultural Showcase, where her parkas and pualuuk...

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FEATURES February 01, 2018 - 1:30 pm

Many furry patients at Iqaluit’s pop-up animal clinic

“In one day that’s quite spectacular"

BETH BROWN

Pet carriers full of furry patients line the floor of Iqaluit’s Roman Catholic parish hall where a makeshift animal hospital is set up this week. 

The Iqaluit Humane Society said earlier this month it expected around 80 families to access free vet services at its five-day clinic. But on day one...

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FEATURES January 31, 2018 - 1:30 pm

The cuddly cause behind Nunavut’s boom in foxes and owls

Many Arctic predators depend on the humble lemming

JOHN THOMPSON

There’s a reason why snowy owls have descended from Canada’s eastern Arctic to parts of the northeastern United States in such great numbers this winter.

It also happens to be a reason why Arctic foxes have been spotted near many Nunavut communities this winter, prompting the territory’s Health...

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