Nunatsiaq News
FEATURES April 18, 2018 - 3:30 pm

Northern lights shine south in Toronto outdoor exhibit

“The best thing is when you can see artwork in the lights"

SARAH ROGERS

The only lights you can usually see when you look skyward in Canada’s largest city are those left on in office towers at night.

But until the end of May, people in Toronto can enjoy the northern lights and learn a bit of Inuit folklore right from the city’s downtown core.

A new installation by...

FULL STORY
FEATURES April 14, 2018 - 1:00 pm

Scientists stumble upon super-salty lakes beneath Nunavut glaciers

Unusual discovery may offer insights into extraterrestrial life

NUNATSIAQ NEWS

Researchers studying Nunavut’s Devon Ice Cap have made a surprising discovery: beneath more than half a kilometre of ice lie two super-salty lakes.

They’re the first lakes of this kind to be found beneath glaciers. And scientists hope the unusual conditions created in these water bodies may give...

FULL STORY
FEATURES April 09, 2018 - 1:29 pm

Alaskan Inupiaq poet named first Indigenous Guggenheim fellow in poetry

"I hope that the creative work I can undertake in the future contributes to the assertion, not the desertion, of our identities"

JANE GEORGE

The acclaimed Inupiaq Alaskan poet Joan Naviyuk Kane plans to spend the next year researching and writing a new collection of poems, called Dark Traffic, with a big goal: to redefine how people look at the Arctic and Indigenous people.

Kane will be able to work on this new collection of poems...

FULL STORY
FEATURES April 07, 2018 - 10:30 am

Meet the Louis Armstrongs of the Arctic Ocean

“We heard hours and hours and hours of singing from these whales, from November up until early April.”

JOHN THOMPSON

Bowhead whales, it turns out, are the jazz singers of the ocean.

That’s the conclusion of Kate Stafford, an oceanographer with the University of Washington, who has been studying the singing of bowhead whales off the northeast coast of Greenland with the help of underwater microphones.

Her latest...

FULL STORY
FEATURES April 03, 2018 - 7:59 am

Nunavik podcast an open forum to talk about sex—and much more

“We need to be able to protect ourselves, but others as well"

SARAH ROGERS

A group of Nunavimmiut youth sit around a table chatting about one of the region’s biggest taboos—sex and sexual health.

Kuujjuaq youth leader Olivia Ikey recalls making an appointment to see a sexual health nurse at the community’s health centre and compares the experience of waiting to see the...

FULL STORY
FEATURES April 01, 2018 - 8:00 am

APRIL FOOLS! Researchers find evidence of giant, prehistoric Arctic bunny

Dubbed "ukaliraaluk," creature may have stood nine feet tall

JANE GEORGE

Canadian researchers revealed stunning new evidence yesterday that raises questions about the evolution of mammals on Earth: fossilized bone fragments that reveal the existence of a giant nine-foot hare that once hopped its way around Ellesmere Island.

“We can’t be certain about the colour of this...

FULL STORY
FEATURES March 24, 2018 - 10:45 am

Art curator digs into history of traditional Inuit needle cases

“If we’re not passing along our knowledge, it’s lost”

PATRICIA LIGHTFOOT

When Krista Ulujuk Zawadski came across a collection of Inuit containers for sewing needles, also called kakpiit, from the 1800s, she wondered why, when growing up in Rankin Inlet, she had never heard of these unassuming little objects that were once vital to Inuit survival.

Zawadski, who is now...

FULL STORY
FEATURES March 13, 2018 - 3:30 pm

Northern style: parka exhibit decks out Nunavut legislature

Nunavummiut know a thing or two about cold-weather fashion

BETH BROWN

You might think the small seal- and caribou-skin parkas hung in the entrance hall of the Nunavut legislature this month belong to an earlier time—but they were actually worn by the children of Iqaluit resident Matty McNair, who curated the legislature’s new Inuit parka exhibit. 

Three “North...

FULL STORY
FEATURES March 07, 2018 - 3:30 pm

Country food key to nutrition in Nunavut, dietitian says

Fruits from the sea your best bet for vitamin D

BETH BROWN

Feeling low on energy Numavummiut? Maybe you’re in need of some extra vitamin D or a boost to your iron levels?

If so, then filling up on country foods like caribou, char and maqtaq could help you out, Iqaluit Public Health dietitian Madonna Achkar said.

“Caribou is rich in iron which is a...

FULL STORY
FEATURES February 20, 2018 - 1:40 pm

All in the family: new children’s book shows Nunavut family diversity

“It’s reflective of life in Nunavut and the different families that you see”

BETH BROWN

In Nunavut, the “nuclear family”— meaning mom, dad and 1.5 kids—isn’t the only norm.

That’s why Kerry McCluskey and Jesse Unaapik Mike dreamed up their new Inhabit Media book, titled Families, so that children from different family makeups would know that every kind of family is the right...

FULL STORY
FEATURES February 07, 2018 - 1:30 pm

Nunavik seamstress embellishes tradition

“We all grew up watching our mothers and grandmothers, so it’s in our DNA"

SARAH ROGERS

OTTAWA—In a sea of sealskin and colourful commander fabric, Winifred Nungak’s booth stands out for its pop of pink, from plush pompoms to dyed fox-fur mittens.

The Kangirsuk seamstress has curated a booth at this year’s Northern Lights Business and Cultural Showcase, where her parkas and pualuuk...

FULL STORY
FEATURES February 01, 2018 - 1:30 pm

Many furry patients at Iqaluit’s pop-up animal clinic

“In one day that’s quite spectacular"

BETH BROWN

Pet carriers full of furry patients line the floor of Iqaluit’s Roman Catholic parish hall where a makeshift animal hospital is set up this week. 

The Iqaluit Humane Society said earlier this month it expected around 80 families to access free vet services at its five-day clinic. But on day one...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 31, 2018 - 1:30 pm

The cuddly cause behind Nunavut’s boom in foxes and owls

Many Arctic predators depend on the humble lemming

JOHN THOMPSON

There’s a reason why snowy owls have descended from Canada’s eastern Arctic to parts of the northeastern United States in such great numbers this winter.

It also happens to be a reason why Arctic foxes have been spotted near many Nunavut communities this winter, prompting the territory’s Health...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 22, 2018 - 8:10 am

Arctic beasts are shrinking in size due to climate change: study

Researchers find that winter rain is interfering with muskox's diet

SARAH ROGERS

The muskox, or umingmak, has long been one of the Arctic’s largest beasts, but new research has found the species is shrinking in size in some parts of the Arctic as a warming climate makes it harder for pregnant muskox to stay properly nourished through the winter months.

A new study published...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 17, 2018 - 8:00 am

Tiny parasite may pose health risks for Canada’s North

“It is critical for public health organizations and practitioners to employ strategies, to reduce the risk"

JANE GEORGE

You don’t hear much about the dangers posed by toxoplasmosis, but infections caused by the tiny parasite are powerful enough to make you sick and cause damage to the brain, eyes and other organs.

With levels of human infection in parts of the Canadian Arctic among the highest in the world,...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 16, 2018 - 1:30 pm

Nunavut artist gets dolled up

"I see things that come to my mind and I just have to create it"

SARAH ROGERS

Vicky Pauloosie Arnauyumayuq likes to create.

The Arctic Bay mother and office administration student is a self-described artist, who enjoys drawing, painting and sometimes carving in her free time.

But she’s added a new craft to her hobbies in recent months, which is grabbing the attention of...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 16, 2018 - 9:30 am

Nunavut newcomer beats the blues with snow skating

“It helps relieve stress, form friendships and build community among youth”

BETH BROWN

There’s a new way to beat the winter blues in Taloyoak, thanks to newcomer Jonathan Nuss.

When the avid skateboarder moved to the western Nunavut community four months ago, he took up learning a new kind of boarding more suited to the North.

It’s called snow skating.

Never heard of it? Neither...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 09, 2018 - 11:54 am

Qaggiavuut offers a coffee klatch with a difference

Arts group invites Iqalungmiut to talk shop every second Tuesday

BETH BROWN

Hey Iqalungmiut, are you hoping to work your creative muscles in the new year?

If so, then clear your schedule for every other Tuesday night, between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.

Qaggiavuut is starting a twice-monthly coffee house series, called Kaapi Tuesdays, to bring Nunavut artists together in an open...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 09, 2018 - 9:30 am

Arctic ookpik boom sees many snowy owls head south this winter

"Snowies" have been seen in south-central United States

JANE GEORGE

Snowy owls have become the new Canadian “snow birds” this winter, migrating south of the border in great numbers, and some of the birds, called ookpiks in Inuktitut, have gone as far south as the state of Missouri where their presence on power poles, hay bales and fences has attracted a lot of...

FULL STORY
FEATURES January 02, 2018 - 11:00 am

Nunavik’s longtime Oblate missionary, Father Jules Dion, dies at 89

Father Dion arrived in Nunavik in 1955

JANE GEORGE

For nearly 60 years, Oblate missionary Father Jules Dion—better known in Nunavik by his Inuktitut name, Pirtiu—served as priest, mechanic, carpenter, dog team runner, hunter, fisherman, doctor, dentist and part-time snowmobile salesman to several generations of Inuit in Quaqtaq and...

FULL STORY
FEATURES December 21, 2017 - 3:30 pm

Why not feast on country food this Christmas?

Premier Paul Quassa's favourite treat, plus caribou recipes from Iqaluit and Kuujjuaq

SARAH ROGERS

Samuel Hamel-Ratté doesn’t get to cook with country food as much as he’d like to.

The long-time head chef at the Kuujjuaq Inn can only use fish and meat that comes from government-regulated facilities.

But Hamel-Ratté said he enjoys cooking with country food at home, when he can.

In the years...

FULL STORY
FEATURES December 20, 2017 - 3:30 pm

Ancient bears that roamed Ellesmere Island had a sweet tooth

3.5 million years ago, early bears were already well adapted for the cold

JOHN THOMPSON

It turns out that the bad teeth of a bear that once padded around Ellesmere Island about 3.5 million years ago can tell us something about modern bruins.

Cavities in the teeth show that the bear had a sweet tooth. The now-extinct species, which resembled a small black bear, would have munched on...

FULL STORY
FEATURES December 19, 2017 - 3:30 pm

Iqaluit’s celebrity chef offers tasty treats for Christmas

Sheila Lumsden shares recipes with Nunatsiaq News

BETH BROWN

Sheila Lumsden carefully removes the pin bones from a quartered fillet of Arctic char, so that the sharp spinal shards don’t end up in her waterzooi.

“Waterzooi” is a traditional Belgian stew that can be made with chicken, or any kind of fish.

But Lumsden’s recipe uses Arctic char, bringing—as...

FULL STORY
FEATURES December 19, 2017 - 9:30 am

For these Nunavut inmates, the future is carved in stone

"This carving program is one of the few successes we’ve had"

STEVE DUCHARME

On most days at the Makigiarvik Correctional Centre in Iqaluit, you can find inmate Ottokie Samayualie covered in stone dust, diligently working on his latest dancing bear carving in the fenced courtyard of the minimum security jail.

But on the morning of Dec. 13, a walrus figurine sits on...

FULL STORY
FEATURES December 14, 2017 - 8:15 am

Inuk chef Trudy Metcalfe helps feed the multitudes

Arctic caribou meets South Asian curry at Flavours of the North

COURTNEY EDGAR

SPECIAL TO NUNATSIAQ NEWS

OTTAWA—Trudy Metcalfe, a renowned chef who’s originally from Nunatsiavut, was honoured this past weekend to be one of the faces of Flavours of the North, an outdoor culinary and cultural event on Parliament Hill held near the end of Ottawa’s Canada 150 celebrations.

She...

FULL STORY
 | Older