Southern Inuit of Labrador start talks with Ottawa

Hopes high with NunatuKavut Community Council, which has spent decades trying to negotiate a land claim

By NUNATSIAQ NEWS

NunatuKavut and the federal government have started discussions about Indigenous rights and self-determination.


NunatuKavut and the federal government have started discussions about Indigenous rights and self-determination.

The Government of Canada has begun talks with the NunatuKavut Community Council, to recognize the Indigenous rights of some 6,000 Inuit in south and central Labrador.

The talks “will be community-driven, could cover many different issues, and involve ongoing engagement with NunatuKavut members,” according to a news release.

“The goal is to obtain greater clarity on the rights, needs and interests most important to the community as well as finding common ground to move ahead in partnership toward shared solutions that help advance reconciliation and renew the relationship.”

NunatuKavut have spent several decades trying to negotiate a land claim. The new talks will cover NunatuKavut’s governance, as well as lands and resource interests in Labrador.

“We look forward to entering into good-faith negotiations with Canada on a modern rights agreement that allows us to fulfill our vision of being self-governing and providing and caring for one another, our families and our communities while nurturing our relationship with our lands, ice and waters,” said Todd Russell, president of the NunatuKavut Community Council, in the announcement.

“And I thank our people for their steadfast support. We have stood united as a people and have remained hopeful and optimistic about a day when our rights would be respected and recognized. That day has come. This is our time!”

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