Armed forces to take to land, sea and air as part of annual exercise

Operation Nanook-Nunakput to take place around 5 Nunavut communities

During survival skills training for Operation Nanook near Rankin Inlet members of a Canadian Ranger patrol group prepare a dish of muktuk. Photo taken in Aug. 28, 2016. (Photo Courtesy of Petty Officer Second Class Belinda Groves, Task Force Imagery Technician)

By David Lochead

People in some Nunavut communities could see more military boats, vehicles and jets flying overhead starting this week.

That’s because the Canadian Armed Forces is scheduled to begin its annual Operation Nanook-Nunakput. It’s part of the larger Operation Nanook, which is pan-territorial. The Department of Defence sent out an advisory about the operation on Aug. 6.

Military exercises are planned to occur in and around Arctic Bay, Cambridge Bay, Grise Fiord, Kugluktuk, Pond Inlet and Resolute Bay.

Armed forces personnel are scheduled to do patrols over the ground, sea and air. There will also be naval patrols in co-ordination with the Canadian and United States coast guards, says Defence Department Capt. Suzanne Nogue.

According to the advisory, the exercises aim to improve the military’s ability to operate in challenging environments, improve co-ordination with Indigenous communities and northern governments, and make sure the military is able to effectively respond to any potential threats in the area.

“We like to work with northern partners so we can enhance our abilities in the North,” said Nogue.

The annual Operation Nanook began in 2007. Previous exercises have included responding to simulated air disasters and wildfire evacuations, according to the defence department.

Joint Task Force North will be conducting the operation. Every effort will be made not to disturb residents where exercises occur, says the advisory.

Operation Nanook-Nunakput 2021 will run between Aug. 12 and Sept. 12.

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(8) Comments:

  1. Posted by Weird photo but ok on

    What exactly does cutting up a piece of muktuk have to do with National Defense? Hopefully the Northern Rangers are being trained military techniques to protect the soverignty of the north.

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    • Posted by Ilaarjuaq on

      Perhaps if you joined you would see the larger picture? The Rangers are eating a traditional food which the army are encouraged to try in case their exercises lead to a true event and they had to resort to local foods.

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    • Posted by Good Point on

      To the photographer this was surely a unique moment worth capturing in a picture. The choice to use this particular image by our local media, by contrast, demonstrates the kind representations they bias toward; in this case one that reinforces a very familiar and limited image of Inuit, one constrained by the imagination of journalists who are unable to see beyond a basket of cultural cliches. Inuit cutting up and eating maktaaq. Of course, what else do Inuit do? What else are they capable of, especially within the context of this training?

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      • Posted by Meme Machine on

        In other words the local media tends to see Inuit through a small cluster of stereotypes based on particular ideas of what Inuit are based on culture. The media reinforces these, either consciously or subconsciously, thus passing these stereotypes along to the public–both Inuit and non-Inuit alike.

        If this kind of thing interests you, google ‘memetics’

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  2. Posted by Got It Sort of Backwards on

    Kind of works the other way. The Rangers have almost non-existent military training (there is in fact quite a movement to have them removed from the military umbrella – I move that I fully support), but instead they provide training on land survival skills to other elements of the military.

    They have no ability to protect anything, but legally their presence as uniformed members of the military reinforces Canada’s sovereignty.

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  3. Posted by I live in the Arctic on

    nice bit of cultural exchange eh? fancy sushi on the menu for the day.

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  4. Posted by ChesLey on

    It’s too bad with the way the way that things are going with social media (anti-social media) what with the rabid animal behavior online. So bad it burdens us one and all, what are we becoming.

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