Federal budget promises millions for Inuit housing

Idlout ‘decently satisfied’ about proposed investments, Bérubé plans to vote against budget

Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland delivered the 2022 budget speech in the House of Commons Thursday afternoon. (Screenshot from ParlVu)

By Jeff Pelletier

The 2022 federal budget is promising millions of dollars for housing in Inuit communities and the modernization of Arctic defence, among other northern investments.

Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland tabled the budget, titled A Plan to Grow Our Economy and Make Life More Affordable, in the House of Commons Thursday.

It includes several promises the Liberal government made on housing and infrastructure. The three territorial governments are to receive $150 million “to support affordable housing and related infrastructure.” Of that money, $60 million is going to the Government of Nunavut.

Inuit communities across Canada are also set to receive an additional $845 million over seven years in housing support. That comes from a proposed $4 billion in housing services through Indigenous Services Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada.

Freeland addressed the challenges of providing specific housing solutions in her speech.

“There is no silver bullet which will immediately, once and forever, make every Canadian a homeowner in the neighbourhood where they want to live,” she said.

“As Canada grows — and as a growing Canada becomes more and more prosperous — we will need to continue to invest, year after year after year, in building more homes for a growing country.”

On defence, the budget repeats a 2021 commitment to spend $252 million over five years “to sustain existing continental and Arctic defence capabilities” and to modernize the North American Aerospace Defence Command.

Also in the budget, $14.5 million over five years is proposed “to support the completion and operations” of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station, located in Cambridge Bay.

Freeland’s speech focused largely on national issues, with specific regional investments buried in the budget document.

She concluded her address by highlighting the bravery of the Ukrainian people which she said has inspired Canadians during Russia’s invasion.

“They have reminded us that the strength of a country comes from the strength of its people, and they have reminded us that there should be no greater priority for everyone in this House than to build a country that we would all be willing to fight for,” she said.

Conservative interim Leader Candice Bergen panned the budget over what she called “out of control spending,” in a scrum outside the House of Commons while Freeland was speaking.

“Well, we are seeing an NDP budget, delivered by an NDP-Liberal government,” Bergen said, referring to an agreement the two parties reached last month that will see the NDP support the Liberal minority government in Parliament until 2025.

Lori Idlout, Nunavut’s NDP MP, said in an interview with Nunatsiaq News she is “decently satisfied” from what she’s read in the budget – a far cry from her previous statements calling on the Liberals to do more on housing and reconciliation.

Idlout specifically praised the Liberals on their housing and mental health investments, but said a $5.1 million investment to the RCMP to support community-led responses to unmarked burial sites at former residential schools was “strange.” She said the money should go directly to communities.

Idlout said she will support the budget, and that her fellow NDP MPs deserve credit for influencing the Liberals to address some of their legislative priorities.

“Twenty-five NDP MPs were quite effective in their relationship-building with the Liberal government,” she said. “This is just the beginning, we’re going to be fighting for more.”

Sylvie Bérubé, the Bloc Québécois MP for Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, was less satisfied with the budget.

Although she said she was happy Nunavik Inuit communities would benefit from some of the housing investments, she said the budget lacked clear solutions on climate investments, inflation and health transfer payments to Quebec.

She and her party do not plan to support the budget.

“There’s no relief currently for the Québécois population and the cost of living, so we’ll vote against,” she said in a French language interview.

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(44) Comments:

  1. Posted by Colin on

    So Nunavut is getting money to build about 200 housing units. But that’s about one thousand fewer than necessary to house the homeless and the overcrowded and to replace houses needing replacement or major repairs. MP Mumilaaq Qaqqaq should let it be known that that’s nowhere near good enough.

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    • Posted by Crystal Clarity on

      She’s not the MP anymore. It’s Lori Idlout. Or was that a joke?

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    • Posted by Colonial on

      Why should housing the homeless be any priority? I say only give housing to people willing to work or buy it.
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      Do you know that everywhere else in Canada that 85% of the housing is not social housing? Housing is not an entitlement, but a privilege earned. Nunavut policy has exacerbated the problem with social housing to the point it is not sustainable. One generation soon becomes three, where three times the housing is needed within a 30 year period. Stop the handouts: except in instances of disability – no job, no house.

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      • Posted by Know on

        Southerners already took the best jobs and housing. I say housing should go to the permanent residence of nunavut along with jobs. That would solve the problem without costing as much. It would improve the public. You are wrong.

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        • Posted by Get educated on

          You need to get educated, that way you’ll have housing with your job, that’s why southerners are having job and house, educated.

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          • Posted by Consistency on

            There are not even enough houses for all the “educated” GN positions that are unfilled. Lack of Housing is a problem at all levels and all levels need help to correct the issue.

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        • Posted by Colonial on

          There are literally jobs that pay $100000 in cash and benefits for receptionists at the GN. If you have a high school degree and are Inuk you can become deputy minister of a department in no time. Free education and unlimited opportunity if you decide to work and are Inuit. I didn’t take your jobs: there’s no one willing to get certified in my field.

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        • Posted by 867 on

          Southerners didnt TAKE those jobs, they EARNED them. The same way Inuit can EARN those jobs. There is no way a southerner will ever get a job and housing over an equally Inuk, none.

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          • Posted by Concerned 867 on

            I think that the history of residential schools, forced relocations and multi-generational trauma associated with the above inhibits some Inuit from getting the ‘same’ credentials that a southerner that didn’t have these impediments has gotten. I think skills are needed to advance Nunavut, but there should be acknowledgement that your place in the North is to support and be empathetic to what Canadians past did to Inuit. Your neighbors, who are healing. Inuit that want more for their communities are not wrong. We have to find a way forward, together. We have more in common than we think. Those of us living here.

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            • Posted by Double Concerned 867 on

              I have to agree with this myself. I’d also like to state that I am an Inuk, who has earned and worked hard to get to where I am today.
              There are also a lot of people that are truly dealing with intergenerational trauma, I’ve seen it first hand within my family.
              There are families that are able to instill work ethic and adversity in their offspring despite the trauma they may have gone through.
              There are also families that because of the trauma they have gone through, do not care if their offspring go to school or not because of the trauma they received while attending residential school.
              I’m not sure what the answer is to solving or even mitigating the effects of intergenerational trauma.
              I do know that being kind and empathetic, goes a long way to understanding what our families have gone through in the last 100 years.
              We’ve had to go from living off the land to rapidly adjusting to western civilization.

              We’re working towards a better future. Thank you to all that are helping us get there.

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            • Posted by R U a White Knight? on

              I won’t accept a role in Nunavut of having to listen to a constant stream of blabbering non-sense about how I stole someone’s job. It’s complete crap and that’s just the way it is.

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  2. Posted by Housing and Money on

    Ottawa pumped a huge amount of money into the economy during COVID, and rightly so. It gave people money so they could pay rent and buy groceries.
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    That money “trickled up”, as the property owners paid their mortgage and the the banks paid dividends.
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    As the money accumulated in fewer and fewer hands, it could not all be spent buying necessities.
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    Instead, it went into the stock market and the real estate market.
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    Until that “extra” money is removed (by taxing those who now hold it), it will keep driving up prices, particularly prices of houses and staocks.
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    A relatively few people have lots of money that is chasing too few houses. Everyone else is harmed, because we all need somwhere to live. .
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    It is way past time for Ottawa to selectively remove that extra money from the economy, or that money will hang around, creating inflation and driving up the price of houses.

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  3. Posted by Hopefully good for Canada and the north on

    Oh , the budget, the buying and wearing of a new pair of shoes. I hope northern communities get at least a bit of what Canada will send to Ukarine in the near future, not that I’m against aid to help other countries. And the minister mentions that Canadians being inspired by Ukrainians in this war, I’m going to say, that Ukrainian should also be inspired by Canadians also. Ukarine has been at War for ever, even though they are now victims of Russian aggression, they need self reflection also. I’m sure Canada will have inspiration to have many of them to come by to see for themselves, how inspired we are. To get up in the morning, turn on the news, it’s about war! And then be thankful! You live in peace, and humanity and peace is your goal.

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  4. Posted by A country we all be willing to fight for on

    When did Canada become a country we will not be willing to fight for ? Canada was always a country we are willing to fight for.

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    • Posted by Which tribe r u? on

      Who is your “we”?

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      • Posted by Peaceful tribe who fought without losing the truth on

        There’s so much fake news and propaganda that it’s difficult to make sense of the war that going on in Ukarine. Both the Russian and the Ukrainian has a deep history of deception, lies , manipulating their own people. I think it’s easy to feel for Ukarine in the kind of news we are getting in Canada, but we need to hesitate for a moment and remember that we’re seeing a war that’s gotten worse, but a war that has been going on forever. Pictures of the Russian president sitting alone at alone at a long table, versus president of Ukarine, in T-shirt pleading with the free world for money , equipment, support to fight, is propaganda , and the media is the director. The minister of finance with deep ties family and work to Ukarine, and telling Canadians to admire Ukarine, is concerning. It’s an insult to our soldiers to fought for our freedom in the world wars and who continue our desire to have freedom. We don’t need these deceptive countries advice. Our fight for Canada lies in our everyday desire for peace. It’s what we do everyday as we live.

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        • Posted by iThink (you are a Russian troll) on

          This is a fascinating comment.

          You begin by speaking out against fake news and propaganda, then attempt to disorient us and create moral confusion.

          How so?

          First, by pointing to the (alleged) moral equivalence between Ukraine and Russia. You say both have “a deep history of deception, lies , manipulating their own people.” You then say the war has been going on “forever” (which is not true at all, by the way).

          After smearing Zelensky as a manipulative beggar you conclude by urging Canadians to embrace their isolationism / neutrality, and why not? After all everything is a lie and propaganda, and this has been going on since “forever.”

          Very tricky stuff and deceiving in its simplicity.

          Yet there is no moral equivalence in this conflict. There is no shared culpability. Russia is the aggressor here. It initiated this conflict and is engaging in war crimes. There is nothing Ukraine has done that warrants this invasion (even if corruption is a feature of its politics, which is true), except express a desire to move away from its Russian orbit.

          Take note people, comments like this are meant to confuse and manipulate you. They are designed to sow confusion, then apathy and ultimately inertia

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          • Posted by Victims of propaganda on

            I think: I can see you’re a victim of propaganda, fake news, and watching a confusing live movie. The comment you refer to has no indication of pro Russian. It’s neither pro Ukraine. It’s a truthful attempt to clear the fog that surrounds this war between Russia and Ukraine sans the propaganda, sans the lies and deceptive life of the two countries which is notoriously embedded in their political agendas. It’s not a lie or being deceptive to point that out. It’s terrible what’s being done to innocent people based on the ideology of their leaders. People being lead down the path of lies. Both sides. It’s the simplest thing to do, just sit back and listen to whats happening , and gullible taking in what the media is reporting, and asking no questions whatsoever ever. Just accept, and react. That kind of thinking is what leads people to follow the authorities without question, as seem in Russia, and soviet manipulated countries.

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            • Posted by iThink on

              You’re right, the point wasn’t to promote Team A or Team B, it was to create moral confusion by sowing doubt about the knowability of truth, by creating uncertainty around responsibility (it’s been going on forever, after all). the point is to make us question our perceptions and eventually give up on passing judgement. It’s very clever, and its effective, I’ll grant you that. Still, it’s manipulation and we need to recognize that.

              I would sincerely encourage anyone interested to check out David Frum’s ‘The Great Russian Disinformation Campaign’ in the Atlantic, which is part review of Timothy Snyder’s book on the topic ‘The Road to Unfreedom.’

              A quote:

              “Clausewitz defined war as the use of violence by one state to impose its will upon another. But suppose new technology enabled a state to “engage the enemy’s will directly, without the medium of violence,” Snyder writes—this would be a revolution in the history of conflict. This revolution, Snyder argues, is what Russia has imposed upon the United States and the European Union.”

              https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/07/the-great-russian-disinformation-campaign/564032/

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              • Posted by I think too on

                No cleverness intended, no moral confusion intended, at least not on the part of this comment. But that’s not to say that the goals of the war participants are not to inflect the concept of moral confusion. Which my point would be indeed they are trying to. That being said, your reference to Synders book, as entertained by David Frum, doesn’t impressed me as anything greater than perception on both the authors, notwithstanding that I agree with almost everything said about the Russian manipulation. In the same token of perception, reading Transparency International Corruption Perception Index is also interesting, although it has potential to narrowness as any, even with Synders book pointing from you. It’s worth reading the index! Of Ukarine being so high on the corruption list , second only to Russia. And being labeled Kleptocracy, but more in a governance of people, rather than the people themselves. Ukarine has a long history of war, and it’s with Russia in many episodes. I feel the free world is aware of both sides. It’s probably why NATO has more hesitancy than would be if not supporting such a corrupt situation to begin with.

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              • Posted by Quickly concluded on

                There’s one characteristic that’s evident to me in you comment. It’s the one of a quick conclusive mind. You take a side very quickly actually. The comment you are referring to gives you confusion because you fail to allow the balance of justification to be rather than nonjudgmental, to be quickly concluded in your already made up view. That’s ok, but don’t act that way , all the while judging the intentions of your perceived opponents. When you do that, you’re now fully discredited, and blinded with opinions disguised in facts. Look back at the comment again , and see how it’s written nonjudgmental and allowing justice to present before all the facts are in.

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              • Posted by Neo on

                I’m afraid that the article and thus the book you mentioned (David Frum’s ‘The Great Russian Disinformation Campaign’ in the Atlantic, which is part review of Timothy Snyder’s book on the topic ‘The Road to Unfreedom.’) is full of inaccuracies..I will mention only a few.
                “In 2004, Putin endorsed EU membership for Ukraine and did not object to NATO enlargement.” This is a flat out lie and it greatly lowers credibility of the whole book. Russia bombed Georgia in 2008 after it was offered NATO membership alongside with Ukraine..That’s like saying that Kennedy endorsed Russian missiles in Cuba. We all know how that ended..
                Russia is against NATO enlargement since its beginning. In 1955, the same year as East Germany joined NATO, Warsaw pact was created to ‘balance the powers’. And that did not end up well either…Russia invaded Hungary in 1956 (thousands of people were killed) and Czechoslovakia in 1968 (leaders in the country signed Moscow protocols to save their people and end the occupation) to “help them with contrarevolutions”.. it is really worth to do more reading on these topics, from various sources.
                Regarding the “truthful” media reporting, Noam Chomsky in his book/documentary Manufacturing Consent (1988) explains how the media works in USA..whether it’s Russian or American News Outlets, they all have their bias and serve what needs to be served to the masses..of course a few exceptions exist..maybe a book by Edward Bernays from 1928 will open your eyes even more. It certainly did open my eyes.
                There is somewhat partially correct information sprinkled in the article (and the book), but it would take enormous time to verify every single statement. The fact that Snyder was speechwriter for president GWB already indicates the tone/character of the book. And let’s not kid ourselves, if Russia uses disinformation campaigns (they obviously do), we really think that other states, especially ‘western’ countries do not? They happily use it against their own citizens too..

                I will end this post by saying that I hope Indigenous Peoples will heal soon and will get through the trauma they went and are going through. The same people who “did that” to you were doing exactly the same thing with population in Europe for centuries (before the world wars). People there managed to heal and create new things, look ahead, I genuinely wish you that you heal and continue in your life well too.

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                • Posted by iThink on

                  We know Putin didn’t endorse NATO membership for Ukraine by the time of the Bucharest Conference in 2008, the point (which you would need to have read the book to get. Did you read it?) is he underwent a major transformation in tactics from 2004, at which point he took a much more conciliatory tone toward the west. In fact Russia, at one time, sought NATO status for itself!

                  I agree with your point that the US media also “manufactures” its own forms of propaganda, narrative and conformity. So what? We’re not talking about bias we’re talking about a disinformation campaign. Even if you could establish that US media was doing the same types of things I don’t get the relevance? Does that soften the fact that Russia is doing it?

                  By the way Snyder was never a speech writer for Bush. Should we discard your comment for inaccuracy?

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                  • Posted by Neo on

                    I’m not sure what you mean by Putin’s “transformation” and by taking
                    a more “conciliatory” tone toward the west. He bombed a country 5 months after it was offered NATO membership. Not sure what is unclear here or needs to be discussed about his stand.
                    Russia wanted to join NATO in the 1990s, how did that end up please? Soviet Union broke apart in 1991…
                    About disinformation campaigns – War on terror is by far one of the biggest and most atrocious disinformation campaigns led by USA in world’s history. There are tons of information on this topic out there.

                    Lastly, one of the first opening lines in the Atlantic article was : “In 2001 and 2002, he was a speechwriter for President George W. Bush.” That’s exactly where I got the information from.
                    That line is magically not in the article anymore, but you can still search “Timothy Snyder speechwriter Bush” and you will get exactly this Atlantic article as a result..where you can still see it..you as a person who recommended this article and read it must be fully aware of this, so not sure what this game is about..and who is discrediting who…

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                    • Posted by iThink on

                      You quoted Snyder saying “In 2004, Putin endorsed EU membership for Ukraine and did not object to NATO enlargement.”

                      In reference to Georgia in 2008 you say “He bombed a country 5 months after it was offered NATO membership.”

                      Exactly, his attitude changed considerably between those two dates. Had you read the book you would know that, and you would know why that was. You would also know this is not the ‘gotcha’ moment you want it to be.

                      As for the speech writer thing, nothing “magically disappeared.” David Frum was a speech writer for Bush, (almost) everyone knows that. Snyder never was. But even if he was, so what?

                      You say the war on terror also produced a massive disinformation campaign. Sure, I can agree to that. But again, so what?

                      It seems to me you’re just flinging poo now and hoping it sticks.

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            • Posted by Ragin Ronnie on

              Its sorta like hiring a plumber to do open heart surgery.

          • Posted by Tickled your regimen? on

            Did the comment tickled your one way regimen? Where do you get all the answers. What do you know about the war in these countries? Where’s your news coming from? What’s confusing to you about the comment? Is there any other option of opinion than your own?

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      • Posted by We are the Canada on

        We are those who will stand up for freedom. The non we will be the ones the we are standing up for also.

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  5. Posted by Ragin Ronnie on

    The last time the FED gave a large contribution to housing was the 500M through what was called the Housing Trust. NHC even installed a President. Guy had no construction or even an accounting background let alone management experience. The whole thing turned out to be a large bomb. Then they quietly moved him to EIA. Just swept the whole fiasco under the rug.

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  6. Posted by Northern Guy on

    So there is now a “distinctions-based” $845 million dollar allocation of housing funds for Inuit. No word yet on who will be handling the money or how it it will be managed but in Nunavut’s case it would either be ITK or NTI. Can someone please point me in the direction of the last house that either of these two organizations built?

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  7. Posted by Inuk Person on

    The Inuit became Canadian citizens in 1870, but the Canadian and the North-West Territories governments let the Inuit be until the late 1940s.
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    If both governments had acted on moving the Inuit into settlements, we’d probably have less housing/social issues.
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    When the Inuit were enticed into moving into settlements in the late 1940s, they were promised free or cheap rent ($2.00/month housing rent), and some of their children were forcibly sent to residential schools.
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    The Canadian/North-West Territories governments are culpable for their inactions during those 70 years, they must compensate the Inuit for being left behind as Canadian citizens.
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    The federal government gives millions or even billions to other countries, yet her citizens are in dire need.
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    Also, the Canadian government continues to fight to be recognized as having sovereignty over the Arctic.
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    In order to be recognized as having ownership of the Arctic and its waters, they sent a group of Inuit from Northern Quebec and Pond Inlet back in the 1950s to claim that Canada has citizens living in the Arctic.
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    The Arctic is very important for Canada, yet, it doesn’t take care of her citizens. The Inuit and the Arctic deserve so much more than what the government is giving them.
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    The Inuit need to take the federal government to court to claim that amount that was supposed to be spent from 1870 to late 1940s!
    .

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    • Posted by Nonsense on

      Inuit engaged professional negotiators and concluded an agreement with government called the Nunavut Land Claim Agreement. Not one sentence in that agreement references perpetual housing at $2/mo for Inuit. This is an urban myth and nonsense.

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    • Posted by What if? on

      Farley Mowat in his writings of Never Cry Wolf, talks about alerting the Canadian Government to possible starvation up Along when he was studying the wolf, in about 1950s. But the government always told Farley to leave the people alone, they know what they’re doing. Some actual starved according to Farley. But have you even wondered about wooden house in the north, and other such material that has to be imported? The igloo didn’t come on the mainstream as resourceful. I’m just saying this to get people to think about, what if Inuit have been lefted alone? What would survived Inuit society be today, in this world, in the year 2022?

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    • Posted by Brucie the Friendly Northern Store Panhandler on

      The Government of Canada transferred to Nunavut the equivalent of $56,000 last year for each and every single Nunavummiut.

      Tell me more about how Canada has left Inuit behind..

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      • Posted by Nevergit acent on

        That is absurd ! Not one person in our community got 56 thousand Dollars from the feds. That’s a blatant lie. As if the federal government can hand out that much to a single person ! What a lie

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  8. Posted by monty sling on

    Thank you FM, a light at the end of the tunnel, first decent budget for the north….Lori nakumiiq.

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  9. Posted by When on

    When do you become a “permanent resident” and not considered “southern” – 10 years – 30 years, second generation, third generation.
    Business that have employed both local and southern staff for over 50 years are still considered outsiders.
    When will there be a realization that every house built anywhere adds a financial burden to either a homeowner or government. Every home owner must continue to maintain their homes or they deteriorate. Every government home requires maintenance. In the case of the North, 25,000.00 per year. Unsustainable
    When will some Northerners realize that Southerners are Canadians, free to travel, live and work anywhere in Canada as Northerners have the same privileges. And both can benefit from each others knowledge and experience. And when do we all stop reliving the past rather than manage the present and plan for the future “together”. I thought that was what being Canadian is and also look to the IQ principals of “sharing”. Think about all those things for a bit. By the by The NHT comments contain a multitude of inaccuracies – get the facts rather than your misguided perceptions. It was a fiasco, no argument there, but wrong persons, wrong qualifications, wrong dollar value, and all, read ALL, GN Departments sat at the decision making table with participation of both resident and non-resident, by the popular definition, players.

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  10. Posted by Northern Guy on

    Can we all finally agree that there is nothing that legally obligates either Canada or the GN to provide access to free of even substantially reduced housing to Inuit! Housing has never been established as a “right” under any piece of legally binding Canadian legislation and that includes the Land Claims Agreement, the Charter and the Constitution.

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    • Posted by 867 on

      People will always revert back to “yes, it is a right” because of Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which is nothing more than a statement prepared and adopted by the UN. It holds no legal status in any country. Unfortunately, many believe that a UN declaration is “law”.

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  11. Posted by Clark on

    It’s great to see the Liberal government providing funds for housing, the problem here is how the GN will handle those funds, the poor quality in design of the houses and the contracts that will be way too expensive to build these inferior housing.
    It’s time to look at other options and designs to build homes, prefabricated, semi prefabricated and so on.
    I think we could be doing a lot better and build more homes for the funds we get, but unfortunately the GN will not seek other options that are available to them.

    • Posted by The Satyr on

      The GN has neither the experience nor the wherewithal to even begin conceptualizing the benefits of something as abstract as “efficiency”

  12. Posted by Mosesi on

    I give my NU Beneficary Status that we signed off as “Extinguish Aboriginal Title” the Canadian Supreme Court so quickly gave NU to for your soul.

    I secede my NU Status for my “Aboriginal Title Back”

    You sheep do what you ought to with your hide to do with your own and never mind mine.

    No thanks NU, better on my own.

    Free Will is awesome. You should try it.

    Called, free and not a mouse nor sheep.

    To each their own, I keep own.

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    • Posted by Ham Sarris on

      Free will is an illusion, so is the idea that you can wish back your ‘Aboriginal title’.

      Have a Happy Easter

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  13. Posted by Oh boy eh on

    The promises have been made countless times over the years now so everyone should be used to it by now. Realize …These promises are coming from the federallies ! Unforeseen since Nunavut became a territory…..self government is the way to go inuit. Understand the conceptualists of our Government nowadays making that kind of a promise.

    Promises Promises…..goes on and on

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