Arts and Culture

Two Nunavut projects among finalists for Arctic Inspiration Prize

Ten projects competing for cash prizes up to $1 million

This year’s finalists for the Arctic Inspiration Prize have been announced, with a project based in Iqaluit in the running for the $1 million prize and another in in Taloyoak up for $500,000. From a new virtual hub for Indigenous women and girls in the Yukon, to increased access to hearing care in Nunavik, the...

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Elisapie named Indigenous Artist of the Year by Quebec music industry association

Elisapie, the Nunavik singer and songwriter, received the Indigenous Artist of the Year award from Québec’s music industry association on Nov. 1. “Very proud of this beautiful award, ‘Indigenous Artist of the Year,’ given to me by the great Kent Nagano and my favorite person, the very great Florant Vollant. This award seems more important than ever to me,” Elisapie said on social media. (Photo courtesy of Elisapie/Facebook)

Ptarmigan anatomy lesson

Kindergarten students at Pitakallak School in Kuujjuaq receive a lesson on the anatomy of a ptarmigan from Etua Snowball, Kativik Ilisarnilirinik’s director of education services, as he butchers several of the birds on Monday, Oct. 26. (Photo by Malaya Qaunirq Chapman)

Royal Canadian Mint releases “entirely Arctic” $10 collectors coin

The Royal Canadian Mint has issued a new “entirely Arctic” collector coin crafted with Nunavut-sourced gold. The reverse of the $10 pure-gold coin features an Inuk with a qulliq and inuksuit. It’s the creation of Nunavik artist Ulaayu Pilurtuut. “Motifs of a traditional qulliq, an Inuit oil lamp that provides light and warmth, as well as inuksuit, symbolizing community and guidance, are powerful symbols of the artist’s culture and way of life,” said a news release about the coin’s issue. Four thousand of the coins, which each retail for $249.95, were minted. (Image courtesy of the Royal Canadian Mint)

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QIA gives away country food in Iqaluit

Iqaluit residents line up to receive country food on Friday, Oct. 9, distributed by the Qikiqtani Inuit Association to mark its annual general meeting. Usually the Inuit organization hosts a community feast, but that was cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions. QIA gave away six caribou, 300 pounds of maktaaq, 100 pounds of char, three seals and bannock. The food was gone in 12 minutes. QIA’s annual meeting ran over schedule and didn’t end up dealing with everything on the agenda. A spokesperson said they still have the social policy items to complete, which they may return to at the end of the month via video conference. (Photo by Mike Salomonie for the QIA)

Iqaluit actress stars in CBC supernatural thriller Trickster

Iqaluit actress Anna Lambe is one of the stars of a new CBC series, Trickster, which premiered last night. The supernatural thriller is adapted from Eden Robinson’s bestselling novel Son of a Trickster. Lambe, who plays a rebellious orphan named Sarah, is seen here with Joel Oulette, who plays the lead character, Jared. Lambe previously received a Canadian Screen Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her breakout role in the film The Grizzlies. She’s also a student at the University of Ottawa, where she studies International Development and Globalization. Trickster airs Wednesdays at 9 p.m. eastern time on CBC. You can also watch it online, at CBC Gem. (Photo courtesy of CBC)

Inuk Style on display now at the Winnipeg Art Gallery

A recently opened exhibition at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, called Inuk Style, includes these unique mittens made by Mona Rebecca Ittiraqtaataq of Taloyoak in 1976. The mittens integrated materials, dyed from lichen and other plants found around the area. They’re part of the Government of Nunavut Fine Art Collection, on long-term loan to the WAG. The Inuk Style exhibition, featuring 24 known Inuit artists, also includes a beaded amauti from Arviat by Ulayok Lucy Kaviok, a parka by Baker Lake’s Jessie Oonark and jewellery by many artists, including Papiara Tukiki, Sakkiasseee Anaija, and William Ukpatiku. The exhibition will remain on display at the WAG, located at 300 Memorial Blvd. in Winnipeg, until 2021. (Photo by Jocelyn Piirainen)

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Kuujjuaq kids receive a lesson in muskrat anatomy

Kindergarten students at Pitakallak Elementary School in Kuujjuaq learn about the anatomy of a muskrat during a lesson by Ayaana Berthe, who also explains the importance of respecting the animal and how to prepare its fur. The animal was caught by Simon Berthe up the Kuujjuaq River. (Photo by Malaya Qaunirq Chapman)