Nunatsiaq News
NEWS: Nunavik September 13, 2018 - 9:29 am

Nunavik’s top cop says provincial police response too slow in crisis situations

“The delay in having the SWAT teams come in to assist us is unacceptable"

SARAH ROGERS
KRPF chief Jean-Pierre Larose wants to know why the SQ didn’t send a SWAT team to Inukjuak last week until 12 hours after the force would have received the request. “The delay in having the SWAT teams come in to assist us is unacceptable,” he told Kativik Regional Government council meetings in Kuujjuaq on Sept. 12. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)
KRPF chief Jean-Pierre Larose wants to know why the SQ didn’t send a SWAT team to Inukjuak last week until 12 hours after the force would have received the request. “The delay in having the SWAT teams come in to assist us is unacceptable,” he told Kativik Regional Government council meetings in Kuujjuaq on Sept. 12. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)

KUUJJUAQ—The Kativik Regional Police Force says help from Quebec’s provincial police could have changed the outcome of a standoff that ended in the death of a Nunavik man last week.

Nunavik police officers shot and killed an Inukjuak man, after he fired at officers following an overnight hostage-taking and standoff in the Hudson coast community.

Preliminary investigation shows that, just after 9 p.m. on Sept. 4, Tommy Ningiuk took a number of hostages and barricaded himself, armed, inside his Inukjuak home.

KRPF officers in Inukjuak responded to the incident, negotiating with Ningiuk through the night with the help of two other officers flown in from Puvirnituq, while Ningiuk fired his weapon outside the home.

KRPF chief Jean-Pierre Larose said he called the Sûreté du Québec around 10 p.m. that evening, requesting the SQ fly in its Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team, which is standard in crises.

Local officers were able to release the hostages on the morning of Sept. 5, but Ningiuk remained inside the home. At 11 a.m., Ningiuk fired his weapon at officers and officers returned fire, fatally wounding the 40-year-old man.

Quebec’s independent investigation agency, the Bureau des enquêtes independantes, has now taken over the investigation.

The agency’s version of events suggested the SQ was there to respond to the standoff, but Larose noted the SWAT team “never arrived.”

“They were still in transit when the death happened,” he said.

Larose wants to know why the SQ didn’t send the team until 12 hours after the force would have received the KRPF’s request.

“The delay in having the SWAT teams come in to assist us is unacceptable,” he told Kativik Regional Government council meetings in Kuujjuaq on Sept. 12. “It’s too often that it takes that long.”

Larose said he’s expressed his concerns to the SQ and has a meeting with the force next week.

The KRPF would have had six officers who responded to the incident between Sept. 4 and Sept. 5, Larose said. But standoffs are stressful, demanding and dangerous, and officers don’t have access to the same equipment and methods as a SWAT team would.

Larose said the force is looking at “alternative impact weapons” to respond to violent confrontations; for example, the KRPF has recently started distributing Tasers to some of its Nunavik detachments.

“But in certain situations where there’s an armed individual with a high calibre rifle, those alternative weapons won’t be useful,” he said.

The BEI is currently investigating six other incidents in the region in which civilians were either killed or injured during a police intervention. Two of them—in addition to the Sept. 5 shooting death—took place in Inukjuak.

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(9) Comments:

#1. Posted by Shoot the messenger ? Inukjuak on September 13, 2018

Tommy Ningiuk could have surrendered to the police, but he chose
to shoot at them, and thus the sad consequences.

#2. Posted by Inukjuak girl on September 13, 2018

First of all,
he did not have hostages!!!
He was too high on medication!
Why not shot him on his arm or on his legs??
How many people died from police officer?
this is ridiculous!!!

#3. Posted by Former on September 13, 2018

Police all over the world are trained to shoot center mass which is chest area, shooting an arm or leg requires precise shots. Under stress this is almost impossible. When officers are confronted with gun fire they go back training and take thier shot, at the end of the day put yourself in thier shoes do you think they wanted to get shot at when they went to work that day, they are trained to stop a threat and protect the public from harm. Become educated in the use of force and attend training before you make judgement on officers actions. It is unfortunate that this happens but it’s reality. When you are in need you call the police and expect them to come to the rescue, yet they do thier job and you think they are wrong. Step into their shoes, most can’t.

#4. Posted by yes, me too former on September 13, 2018

their not their

it takes a lot planning & organizing just to send swat team, first, the SQ search Swat team Officer, check what planes are available, they are highly dealing with whole Quebec Province.

They have to be prepared to carry what ever they need to bring, their protective gears.

Why can’t KRPF start buying and receiving what swat team safety gears needs. Instead of chartering expensive planes with good number of seats and to carry such protective equipment. Send your top Officers to go and get trained how SQ deals as Swat team, go back to school, and why aren’t there anymore Inuk cops?! because, racial force is running Nunavik, KRPF are not welcoming looks, compare to SQ years, SQ Officers were more welcoming type, so many Police brutalities results too with KRPF Officers, more Jeuvenile Police with no experiences of the North, SQ Officers use to meet suspects and giving them a chance and learn Criminal code will give if being proven guilty by Judge not by Cops!

#5. Posted by Inukjuak guy on September 13, 2018

Many hurting people have questions about the whole situation on how to handle stand-offs that are seriously getting out of hand. Train Inuit to be negotiators or else more of these incidences will occur. Mind you police are well trained for these types of situations, but still many former inmates go home to no or little support adjusting to their communities. Ungaluk programs should consider encouraging people to create programs based on their values & courage to face such events that turn out tragically and result in positive turnout. Or is that we’ve a long way to go with pans & objects that are not guns, knives, axes, that they say are deadly weapons?

#6. Posted by Bonnie Ningiuk on September 14, 2018

MY BROTHER TOMMY JOSIE NINGIUK DIDNT HAD ANY HOSTAGES!!

Rest In Peace irniapik ❤️💔❤️

#7. Posted by Mark on September 14, 2018

Dear Bonnie, sounds like a lot of other people will sleep in peace now that your brother is no longer a threat to them or the community.

#8. Posted by Krammy on September 14, 2018

The reporters story says, he had hostages.
Sadly he was shot for trying to kill policemen, nothing to do with
hostages.

#9. Posted by Dont play with guns. Or you will be shot. on September 14, 2018

It always sad to lose a loved one. However. Hostages or not. He shot his gun towards people in an unsafe out of control manner. Police officers dont care if you are inuk, white, black, asain. Etc.  Shoot your gun at them. You die.  Commen sense everyone knows. But still try challenge. Sorry to say. He lost.  With his life.  Reallly dumb ah!!!  Peace!!

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