With Isabelle Parizeau’s resignation, Nunavik’s regional government seeks new boss

Veteran director begins transition out of regional government’s top administrative job

By SARAH ROGERS

Isabelle Parizeau, pictured here at KRG regional council meetings last November, is leaving her role as the organization’s director general. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)


Isabelle Parizeau, pictured here at KRG regional council meetings last November, is leaving her role as the organization’s director general. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)

Nunavik’s Kativik Regional Government is looking for a new director general.

Isabelle Parizeau, the KRG’s current director general, tendered her resignation from the position in late 2015, and will gradually transition out of the job over the coming weeks.

Her departure will mark a major shift at the KRG following the election of Jennifer Munick (Watkins) last fall as the new chair of the KRG’s regional council, replacing long-time chair Maggie Emudluk.

The KRG hasn’t said if a replacement director general has yet been hired, but a spokesperson said Parizeau intends to stay on and help whoever is hired as director general to help to transition into the job.

Parizeau’s resignation marks a career with Nunavik’s regional administration that spans at least two decades.

The Montreal lawyer and daughter of the late former Quebec premier Jacques Parizeau was first hired at the KRG as director of its Legal and Municipal Management Department in 1996.

Parizeau then left Nunavik for a period to work as a legal and policy advisor in other regions, including international development work in Mali. Parizeau worked as a private consultant in Rankin Inlet and as a policy advisor at Nunavut’s Department of Community Government and Services in Iqaluit. She returned to the KRG in 2007 as assistant director general.

Working under Jobie Tukkiapik, who then served as director general, Parizeau was appointed as interim director when Tukkiapik resigned in 2012 to run for president of Makivik Corp.

She stayed on in that job for three more years.

During that time, the positions of two assistant directors remained vacant, while the KRG continued to look for Inuit candidates to fill those vacancies, as well as Parizeau’s position.

And the absence of those positions was apparently felt throughout the organization.

“The step of hiring that assistant director would go a long way in making that overall work environment go a little smoother,” said the KRG employees’ union president Victor Mesher at a regional council meeting last November.

But during her career with the organization, Parizeau made it her goal to retain Inuit employees at the KRG, and help move key staff members into management positions, under the organization’s management succession plan.

The goal is now to hire an Inuk as the KRG’s next director general: the job posting requires candidates to be James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement beneficiaries who are fluent in English and Inuktitut.

Applicants should apply by Jan. 29.

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