Top-paid Nunavut government employees occupy majority of staff housing

Inuit occupy fewer housing units than their non-Inuit colleagues, according to report

Adam Arreak Lightstone, MLA for Iqaluit-Manirajak, tabled a report on Thursday on the Government of Nunavut’s staff housing. (Photo by Mélanie Ritchot)

By Mélanie Ritchot

The Government of Nunavut’s highest paid employees occupy 71 per cent of government staff housing, according to a report tabled in the legislative assembly on Thursday.

This includes those in executive, senior management, middle management and other professional positions.

“The Government of Nunavut’s housing programs have many flaws,” said Iqaluit-Manirajak MLA Adam Arreak Lightstone, who told the legislature he prepared the report based on “numerous” written questions he’s submitted on the topic.

“I hope the ministers will utilize this information for the benefit of the disenfranchised Inuit and lower-income employees,” he said.

Inuit make up 50 percent of the territorial government’s workforce, but only about a quarter of the employees in staff housing, Lightstone said. In total, 1,620 employees are in staff housing units — about half.

Of the 446 Inuit in staff housing, 85 per cent are in lower-income categories, including people in administrative positions.

“I do have high hopes that the situation can and will be corrected,” said Lightstone.

He said he broke down the report by department, so each minister could review the “inequitable distribution of staff housing in their portfolios.”

On Wednesday, Iqaluit-Niaqunnguu MLA Pat Angnakak asked the minister of human resources about “how it is fair for our most highly paid executives to live in heavily subsidized staff housing units.”

The minister, David Akeeagok, said a housing allocation committee determines who qualifies for the limited units.

“It doesn’t matter whether it’s the highest earner or the lowest earner,” he said.

Akeeagok said it’s the low supply of units that is the problem, and the department is looking at options of getting more.

TD 360 5(2) en Staff Housing Distribution Report by NunatsiaqNews on Scribd

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(59) Comments:

  1. Posted by Sam on

    Make them all buy their own houses, but then again there are not that many for sale , too bad we don’t have a housing market here, they can all afford it.sad capital city

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    • Posted by John on

      It would be great if they could invest like that in Nunavut but unfortunately these high paid employees are here for a short time 4-5 years getting their job experience and saving up to buy their house or condo down south. Once they build up their job experience and add to their CV they are gone, next one takes over and start all over again. Revolving door unfortunately and the system in place is set up to be like that and will not change anytime soon.

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  2. Posted by A Day in the Life of Nunavut on

    Here we go, whip up the xenophobia, grievance and racism again.

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  3. Posted by Name withheld on

    It’s unfortunate that those in high salaries making 6 figure are all in GN staff housing when they can easily purchase house or apply for NDAP or what ever programs from NHC,

    Adam you really need to get into Minister for Housing or HR as you are the one asking questions and making sure your getting paid for what you were voted for!!

    So many other places in Nunavut have empty GN units as HR isn’t putting those jobs out needed or vice-versa.

    It’s not only allocations to individuals who are successful to land a job with staff housing but also outside contractors who are hired by GN departments for a short term are given staff housing who the Dept pay and rents from NHC.

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    • Posted by hermann kliest on

      the cabinet will do their upmost to keep Adam from decision make process, this young man deserves a say so position at the house as Minister…keen eye Adam and Pat, fight for us, the normal folks. Subsidized housing PLUS their bonus popping up soon for the senior staff (wish I could be in tax free 14K category) even if this happens, there’s top civil servants (servants eh?) high echelon who live in their own world, their own ways of doing things. Ministers are just a signatures for the high up GN staffers. Too bad, Adam you have good idea, thoughtful one and probably marked now by many senior staff as dunk hill disturber. BUT keep up work.

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  4. Posted by KitikmeotWest on

    Think that is wrong? Check our municipal government housing, 300 bucks a month and absolutely not available to locals.

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  5. Posted by Northern Inuit on

    Even homeowners have it tough. some even more so.

    the cost of owning a home can be far more expensive than renting, with mortgage, insurance, power, water, satellite, internet and FUEL.

    the total cost of owning a home can be much more than renting an apartment.

    don’t forget when something fails, whether it’s a zone valve for the boiler, water pump, frozen drain valve or other mechanical issue the home owner pays for the repairs.

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    • Posted by inooya on

      As you said The cost of owning a home can be far more expensive than renting, with mortgage, insurance, power, water and FUEL. But i am going to add on a few more. And the land lease to Hamlets and the Gn in Iqaluit. In total i pay almost per month with out the lease stuff around $2500.00. Our MLA’s in the campaign pitch a few years ago promised to help the private home owners. They did not

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      • Posted by Houses make money on

        As much as I also like to complain about the responsibilities and costs of owning a home, we should all know the risks and costs before going into it.
        .
        And your hard work as a home owner is rewarded by skyrocketing market value for your house. If you bought a few years ago then you probably made at least 100k on your investment…. If not more. I’d love to know how much the market has grown over the past few years, but the data for Iqaluit is garbage and people are very hush hush about their home sales on Facebook. People aren’t even using real estate agents anymore.

    • Posted by hermann kliest on

      I take this high cost any day, It’s my home, no one or others shares it in the past. why would you want to rent that had so many that have lived in it? owning a house is a privileges’ to oneself, not a welfare system.

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  6. Posted by So? on

    What’s wrong with that? We need to have those positions filled. If they can only be filled by providing housing to the employees then, oh well.

    As a professional Inuk myself, I get housing for providing my services to the Government. I went to school for many years to get my education so that I could provide services to Inuit in Nunavut but I would have no place to live and wouldn’t be able to provide my services to Nunavummiut if housing wasn’t provided as a part of my compensation. This is probably true for all those other positions also. Those people wouldn’t be able to provide their services if they weren’t given housing as a part of their compensation.

    Also, I’ve seen many Inuit and Nunavummiut who work in main level positions that live in subsidized government housing. The problem is that there needs to be more housing period. Not that individuals who provide assistance to run our territory are provided housing as part of their compensation because if they weren’t they wouldn’t be here and Nunavut wouldn’t be doing how it’s doing.

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    • Posted by 7vanga on

      When you do your income tax, does the subsidy count as a benefit? Yes we need more housing period or employ some positons out of the territory like lawyers and specialist that dont require front line work. This woukd leave more housing for the lower income employees. Too many inuit are living with their parents due to lack of housing and this has its own challenges. I worry my child will not have independance if he choses to be a machanic in town without housing. We are driving our inuit into southern cities to get housing. What happend to the nunavut we dreamed of

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      • Posted by Northern Guy on

        For most public sector employees the housing subsidy is counted as a taxable benefit. Not sure about the private sector.

        • Posted by Wrong on

          This is incorrect, if you live in subsidized housing it is not a taxable benefit. If you are a homeowner and receive the GN’s Household Allowance, that is a taxable benefit. The after-tax amount of the allowance isn’t even enough to cover heat for a house, which is fully paid for if you’re in a GN unit.

          • Posted by Northern Inuit on

            the GN’s Housing Allowance does help but truth be told, it does not cover heat in the middle of winter for two weeks let alone one month. then throw in the land lease from the Hamlet and Government of Nunavut it’s basically gone.

    • Posted by laugh out loud on

      I love this nickname and hope we see more of it

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  7. Posted by Blind eye on

    I am happy to see Adam raising the issue. How has it been allowed that QEC only provided housing to staff to IQ and Baker staff. Mostly non-Inuit. Why was only provided for those from outside of Nunavut. How long has this been going on and why nobody did anything?

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    • Posted by Upon Reflection on

      Adam has never had much of substance to say on anything, so he bangs the same pots and pans he always does and pretends to have pointed out something profound when in reality the issues are a lot more complex than he knows how to treat them.

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  8. Posted by Stop the division on

    Whats with these reports that make southerners look bad. Southerners only come up here to fill positions that arent able to be filled by inuit. Hopefully one day that will no longer be needed, but until then southerners will keep coming to Nunavut and will need staff housing units.

    Not everyone wants to be a homeowner, so staff housing makes it easy to find housing. Like these reports that say non-inuit in the GN make more than inuit. Well I’m sorry but most non-inuit have degrees in their fields which is why the GN hired them. We are a long way away from having Inuit engineers, Inuit doctors, Inuit red seal mechanics. until then, those higher paying jobs will be filled by southerners.

    Lets see a report that shows education levels of GN workers inuit vs non-inuit, daily attendance inuit vs non-inuit, length of coffee breaks inuit vs non-inuit etc… Enough is enough! These types of information only result in xenophobia and racism, furthering the divide. Keep that information private.

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    • Posted by Name withheld on

      I honestly think if you were to make 180k within your household by all means you should be charge umm like 25% of your income towards your rent, same as PH renters. For this reason no contractors would be needed and they can actually be filled by indeterminate position whether you are beneficiary or not….

      The fact of the matter is not enough training is provided, internships are not being offered. Instead most Departments are filling position in as casual to non beneficiary so that this person may have the experience needed if the position ever gets advertised .

      NHC and QEC along with NAC aren’t fulfilling the Article 23 under the land claim agreement as the past and current President aren’t mandating it!! Simple as that .

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      • Posted by Training/ internships on

        25% of salary on rent will dissuade people to work in nunavut, the same reason people who get to live rent free because they don’t work likely don’t see the point in working . There’s already enough socialism in Nunavut.

        And I’m sorry but training and internships won’t create doctors and lawyers. Article 23 fails to address how nunavummiut can fill professional positions.

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        • Posted by Name withheld on

          Doctors and Lawyers aren’t the only high paying jobs with staff housing, Directors, Managers, ADM’S are all high paying jobs along with Senior Finance, Policy advisors, So please do not assume anything more!!!

          If you check with anyone who lives in a public housing they charge roughly 25% of your annual income for a working couple, that could be anywhere from $1800-2100.00 a month, which gives you absolutely no furniture, which is suppose to be affordable to Nunavumiut, I’m not saying “Beneficiaries”, Now compare to someone who might be a making 180K for a GN staff in a GN staff housing, that sure is a lot of difference… Go figure!!!

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    • Posted by Booker T. Washer on

      This is a nice way of belittlement of a certain group(s). I have Inuit friends who are doctors, pilots, heart surgeons, nurses, teachers, preachers, cops, MPs and so on, this is probably the best of number of professionals based on per capita basis with any major groups in Canada.

  9. Posted by Inooya on

    The GN needs to bring back the HAP program. It was easy then to get house’s built in Nunavut since it was a forgivable loan after you paid so much after a few years to have a house shipped and built. No idea why they got rid of it.

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    • Posted by Jimmy on

      I know many people in this community that took advantage of the HAP program. Few are still in their HAP homes. They either found an opportunity to sell at a huge profit and are back in public housing, or they found they couldn’t afford to be owners, turned their house back to the Housing Corporation (again – at a profit) and are back in public housing. OR the units were simply abandoned and sit empty at little loss to the original owner.

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  10. Posted by The Old Trapper on

    We need to rethink housing, especially with the population growth that is occurring now and in the future.
    .
    In southern Canada there has been a private real estate market for a long time, really since the founding of the country. There is also government assisted or supplied housing for people who cannot afford to enter the private ownership or rental market.
    .
    That has never been the case in the north. Since the 1950’s Inuit have been encouraged to move off the land into settlements “in exchange for housing”. At least that is how it’s been portrayed.
    .
    Many people believe that the Government of Canada has the responsibility to provide housing for all Inuit. Where this is in any agreement or legislation is a mystery to me. Perhaps someone would point me in the right direction.
    .
    Now one could say that people themselves have the responsibility to provide their own housing in Nunavut, and should not look to the government. After all prior to settling into communities Inuit did provide their own housing, usually out of animal hide or snow as necessary.
    .
    I’m actually going to argue that the GN, along with the Govt of Canada should provide ALL housing in Nunavut. Get rid of private housing and make it all part of the GN (with substantial funding by Govt of Canada). Call it the price of sovereignty.
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    It really stretches the imagination that with subsistence hunting, gathering, fishing anyone would be able to afford a modern house, heated with a non-renewable resource, and all the conveniences of modern life; electricity, hot & cold running water, sewage disposable, TV, internet, etc. It’s a fiction so let’s stop trying to fit this concept into modern Nunavut.
    .
    Modern Nunavut exists because the federal government wants to exert sovereignty over the north. There are examples of valuable resources available, and quite likely more to come. Fine, if that’s the case the Government of Canada can subsidize everyone, Inuit and non-Inuit alike living in the north with fair and affordable housing. That is the price the rest of Canada needs to pay to keep Nunavut as part of Canada, it is really quite simple.

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    • Posted by Hangry on

      The real fiction here is that subsistence hunting is any way viable in a modern economy.
      Subsistence living gets you a subsistence house: an igloo in winter and a tent in summer. Anything else is being paid for by someone else.
      Subsistence hunters are essentially living at the expense of everyone else. Most hunts themselves don’t even cover their own costs.

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      • Posted by The Old Trapper on

        I’m not trying to argue that subsistence living is “viable” in a “modern” economy, it’s not from a monetary viewpoint.
        .
        But step back a moment. Is a place like Nunavut ever going to be “viable” in a modern economy?
        .
        There are some “renewable” resources, caribou, fish, seals. There are limited possibilities of reducing the population’s energy footprint by using hydro or wind energy, but given the harsh climate energy production is likely to remain in a deficit for a northern population.
        .
        There will never be agriculture which allows the majority of the world’s expanding population to survive. Unless a lot of the mineral resources are found and exploited the current need to subsidize the north will only grow.
        .
        I’m saying accept that fact, and plan for it. Don’t pretend that you can have a “modern” economy in Nunavut. There will be some limited resource extraction but mostly it’s going to take a subsidy from southern Canada to maintain Nunavut and Canada’s sovereignty in the Arctic. Accept the reality and lay out to the federal government what the need will be for housing, education, social programs, infrastructure, etc.
        .
        At the same time plan for what you are going to do with the excess population. Does it just grow unchecked, or do you maintain a set number or subsistence positions are require youth to make their future in the south. This dilemma is not unlike what Newfoundland faced with shutting down the outports.
        .
        Do you keep every community going, or does 25 become 22, 20, 18?
        .
        Nunavut’s leaders need to be thinking 20, 40, 60 years ahead. The future is coming, whether Nunavut is ready for it or not. Housing is just one piece of the puzzle.

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        • Posted by Gobble Gobble on

          I fully agree with you that we need to re-think housing, but I’m the total opposite of you in how to go about it.
          .
          You think that government needs to step up and provide housing for everyone. I strongly disagree. Government’s are notorious for overpaying, the procurement process is extremely burdensome and slow, and they will never be able to keep up with the repairs needed for those who disrespect houses “given” to them.
          .
          What the territory needs is an entirely private market, and the way to do this is through a basic income. When everyone is receiving a basic income, you can increase the public housing rents up to market rents and then start selling off plexes/units either to companies or citizens.
          .
          There’s a lot to it but, eventually, this is the only real way.

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          • Posted by David on

            The first big problem that I see is how does someone receiving a basic Income from the GN/Feds qualify for any type of mortgage or loan to purchase a home in the first place? I don’t believe any bank will ever consider that a reliable income.

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          • Posted by The Old Trapper on

            I think that you have to take human nature into account. Even with a basic income you will have many people who decide to spend the basic income on items other than their rent/mortgage.
            .
            Do you kick them out into the snowbank?
            Do you try to collect what’s owed – knowing that the have already spent the money on booze, drugs, gambling?
            If they damage the building do you take away some of their basic income for repairs?
            What if they have kids?
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            There are some people who just cannot, or will not, look after themselves and make good decisions.
            .
            If the GN supplies all housing at least you might be able to move them into more “basic” housing. People who pay rent, and take care of their apartment/house end up with a slightly better quality/more room.
            .
            Remember if all housing is private there is a large amount of money going to “profit”, basically the people owing the company, the investors, and the banks. Yes the GN may be inefficient but there are ways to fix that.

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            • Posted by Gobble Gobble on

              Hey Trapper, I agree with you that there are always going to be people that will never spend their money where it should go. There’s a lot to discuss around this topic, but the way that I see it there would be a winding down of NHC’s public housing, where NHC can garnish a real (or closer to real) market rent directly from the basic incomes of these people.
              .
              Eventually I see the final step being that the remaining option for those that cannot manage their money being a pay-per-use shelter, again where use of the facility can be garnished from the person’s basic income.

  11. Posted by Northern Exposure on

    I’m sorry, but I don’t understand the purpose and objective of the MLA’s report and effort. Public housing is for the general population, which includes many GN employees, and is subsidized.

    Staff housing is needed to house GN employees in a specific community where their skills and experience are needed. In the absence of available staff housing, the positions could not be filled in those locations. You cannot offer a job to someone from outside the Community and expect them to accept the position if they have nowhere to live. This is not an Inuit vs Non Inuit issue. This is an HR issue.

    Obviously higher skills and experience means higher pay for the employees in those positions. So the conclusion of (surprise) higher paid employees in staff housing is hardly a surprise.

    I think the real question to be asked is, are there enough staff housing units to support the GN hiring needs? What is Housing Corp doing about those needs? Think of the jobs that could be filled if housing was available.

    Maybe you should try another report.

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    • Posted by Reality Check, 1 2 1 2 on

      The purpose of the report, as it is framed here, is to stoke populist resentment, end of story.

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  12. Posted by Northern Guy on

    First off access to affordable and subsidized housing is neither an entitlement nor a right. Now that that is out of the way, the question becomes why the GN or any employer provide a housing subsidy. The main reason is to attract people with specific skill sets to come and work in the territory. It is not entirely the fault of the GN that Inuit largely do not possess the requsite skills and education to qualify for those targeted positions. Any more than it is the fault of say a local plumbing and heating repair business or automotive garage when they offer subsidized housing to their certifed trades people. The employment profile in Nunavut is essentially transient and as long as it remains so the majority of the subsidized housing stock will go to transient employees like nurses, doctors, teachers and senior managers.

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  13. Posted by ian on

    Simple,keep begging the federal gov.for more housing money, look how well we are doing so far.

    • Posted by Working Wonders on

      I am so far very impressed with our most recent approach, which is a combination of grandstanding, pouting, theatrics and affectation. I expect the $$$ to roll in shortly

  14. Posted by This Week in DUH! Magazine on

    Staff Housing serves exactly one purpose: to act as an incentive to attract and retain employees to positions the Government of Nunavut is normally unable to fill. It stands to reason that those positions would also be have the highest salaries. The sooner Nunavummiut disabuse ourselves of the notion that Staff Housing should be reserved for clerks and janitors purely for the reason that they were born here, the sooner we can find a real solution to our housing shortage/ overpopulation problems.

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  15. Posted by Takuyaq on

    In many communities, there are a lot of empty staff housing units. There are also a lot of damaged units not being occupied which were access or private houses.

    Work on making these liveable. Public housing will never keep up.

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    • Posted by TundraTom on

      Lots of excellent points on both sides of the argument raised here. This one is interesting because the staff housing units have been allocated to a position in many cases (communities) but the position has not (or cannot be filled).

      However, it does beg the question as to why there are so many empty staff housing units (including brand new ones) in Cambridge Bay that the GN is paying top dollar on that are sitting empty.

      I believe there was an argument/position floated a few years ago that rather than subsidizing rent, pay the individual more which might then create a viable housing market. Though the time lag would be a challenge.

      There are lots of people who move north and stay north, not everyone is here for a short time. Some yes., but don’t paint everyone with the same brush.

      And yes, Nunavut get ready as maintaining 25 communities (health centres, power plants, etc.) is not sustainable.

      On another note, many GN employees are quite content to remain in their public housing unit as rent collection is not as paramount – just look at the arrears the local housing agencies carry, most of which are uncollectable.

      • Posted by Tom on

        Imagine if the GN was organized enough to build or lease GN units based on need and the rest for social housing, that way units would not sit empty for years.
        Organized enough to have plans in place to fill all empty units and help alleviate the housing shortage.

  16. Posted by connector on

    Keep asking those questions, they are valid you are voted in by the public which is a majority of Inuit who live in Nunavut. it would be also interesting to see how a housing corporation allocates housing to GN employees why is it if you are a local resident in a northern community you cannot own a unit anywhere but if you are a GN employee you are allowed to own as many units as you want down south? any disparity here? NAH! very fair isn’t it….

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  17. Posted by CrazyEskimo on

    Much like Nunatsiaq News is a news outlet aimed at southerners, so is the Nunavut Staff Housing Program.

    > The minister, David Akeeagok, said a housing allocation committee determines who qualifies for the limited units.

    Who sits on this committee? I would guess the demographic makeup of this committee is a microcosm of the housing allocation stats cited in these reports. Ask for and publicize that list of committee members Adam – this is a Public Government as they like to tell us all the time. So be it.

    • Posted by Name withheld on

      GN Committee usually consist of ADMs, DM’s…(Mainly the DM for HR is responsible, or more less has the final say for staff housing. But the process is the Accommodation Coordinator, along with the Property Management Officer who presents the unit application for approval, who recommends which unit they should be assigned to according to their application.

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      • Posted by CrazyEskimo on

        Ok, so who are the Accommodation Coordinator and Property Management Officer? We can publish their names too.

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        • Posted by Name withheld on

          Search the web and its all there. You can even search the rental officer who can easily answer questions as to the tenancy agreement you sign with either GN or PH.

          A lot is there to protect yourself as a tenant or as a landlord
          http://www.nu.rto.ca

          http://www.nunavuthousing.ca/staffhousing
          Iqaluit 867-975-7200
          Baffin 867-897-3660
          Kivalliq 867-857-8700
          Kitikmeot 867-983-2276

  18. Posted by Inuk homeowner on

    Very true, I have a mortgage and with my salary, I haven’t been able to qualify for most NTI programs and no GN subsidy.
    Hope I’ll be able to qualify for more once they see some real-life scenario us Inuit face.

    • Posted by iThink on

      Right here, we need more supports for homeowners. This has to be part of the larger system of trade offs that will help alleviate the problem.

  19. Posted by Crystal Clarity on

    As long as Nunavut continues to need to hire southern workers there will be a need to have government units to house them. You could fill those units when a position goes unfilled for a while but what happens when the position is filled. Do you kick out the local renters and say sorry I told you this was only for a while until we hired someone for that position so you’ll have to move out now. Wouldn’t that be a pretty picture. I have seen this happen in the past and you end up not having any housing for key GN positions. It’s definitely a catch 22 situation.

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    • Posted by Heather on

      And then there is the long term multi year causal employees of the GN, mostly from Nunavut, been on a casual position for years, without receiving benefits and housing. Promised to be put on indeterminate position only to be on a casual hire for more then 2-3 years,
      How is the HR department and the GN not seeing this? How do they let this continue?
      The whole GN system from HR, health, housing, education, contracting needs to be reviewed and changes made to improve our government. Status quo is not working very well.

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      • Posted by Paul on

        These folks of long term casual positions with the GN are not supposed to be like that, GN is breaking their own rules by having casuals for years.
        I believe a casual position is supposed to be for three months or less, the higher ups will terminate the casual before this for a few days and rehire them to start over, getting around the rules or using the loopholes.
        Been happening since Nunavut became and no one has done anything about it. These casuals have to find housing on their own, usually in public housing, when they should be hired full time with housing and benefits and not taking away public housing for others, GN has created two different statuses of employees, one with housing and benefits and the other without housing and benefits but doing the same job for years.

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  20. Posted by Welfare housing on

    How many Inuit employees live in welfare housing? Go for a drive around Iqaluit and you’ll notice that public housing is full of $70000 trucks, multiple snow machines and quads and the like. I have no doubt many Inuit GN employees are gaming the system with family who live for free in these houses. Inuit occupy 99.9% of public housing. Start there by only giving it to those who actually need it.

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  21. Posted by Racism on

    I haven’t read through these comments yet, but there are a LOT of racist comments on the Facebook thread about this article. Tried to report them but of course Facebook supports racism against certain races and ethnicities. You might want to clean that up, Nunatsiaq.

    • Posted by Subterranean Homesick Alien on

      On the landscape of public discourse the Facebook comment section should be compared to a bathroom wall, or perhaps a toilet bowl bubbling with toxic ideas and cognitive distortions.

  22. Posted by Inuk in GN Housing on

    I am in GN housing and 30% of my income goes towards rent. I have been wanting to own a home for almost two years. If I am expected to pay $600k – $700k then I would like a single story bungalow that is on utilidor.

  23. Posted by Why u dum on

    This is an easy problem to solve. 1 give long term employees to option to buy the unit they are living in. 2. Provide the private home owner the same $26,550 forGN repairs @ upkeep, so they can Alford to pay the labour to have it done right. Win win

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