Canada adds third Arctic patrol ship to its fleet

HMCS Max Bernays will be used to assert Canada’s sovereignty in the Arctic

The HMCS Max Bernays, seen here, is the third of what will be six new Arctic patrol ships built as part of Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy. (Photo courtesy of Department of National Defence)

By Nunatsiaq News

The Canadian Armed Forces has taken possession of its third new Arctic patrol ship, the HMCS Max Bernays.

The ship was delivered Sept. 2 as part of Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy, the federal government’s long-term plan to renew the country’s supply of non-combat and combat vessels.

The Arctic offshore and patrol ships are meant to traverse through the North so the armed forces can better assert Canada’s sovereignty in the Arctic, the department of National Defence said in a news release. The ships are being built by Irving Shipbuilding Inc. in Halifax, N.S.

The HMCS Max Bernays is the third of what will eventually be six new Arctic patrol ships, with two ships already deployed — the HMCS Margaret Brooke and HMCS Harry DeWolf.

This third ship is named for Bernays, a Canadian naval hero who served as a chief petty officer on the HMCS Assiniboine during the Second World War’s Battle of the Atlantic.

Features on the new patrol ships include the ability for helicopters to land on board, as well as space to accommodate small vehicles and deployable boats. The ships are 103 metres long and weigh 6,440 tonnes.

The first Arctic patrol ship, the HMCS Harry DeWolf, joined Operation Nanook last year. Operation Nanook is the armed forces’ yearly operation in the North where Canadian military practice defence exercises and build relationships with communities in the area.

This year, the HMCS Margaret Brooke has taken part in the operation, while the HMCS Harry DeWolf could not sail up North due to a failure in its generators.

While the HMCS Max Bernays is currently in Halifax, in 2023 it will make its way to Victoria, B.C., which will be its home base.

 

Share This Story

(9) Comments:

    • Posted by Northern Inuit on

      water is pretty hard 8 months of the year so yeah, Victoria is a nice place for it most of the year

      11
      4
    • Posted by Will Hunting on

      That’s cause… everyone knows that Toronto Canada is “The True North”, strong & free and north of Ontario is just a vast wasteland of ice, snow, polar bear & seals. People know Iqaluit is the only “village” in the land of ice & snow.

      4
      6
    • Posted by John K on

      This may be shocking to hear … but we have arctic on both sides of the north.

  1. Posted by onlooking on

    Patrolling, with sonar equipment on 24/7… what do think is happening to the marine wildlife, and what do you think is going to happened to marine wildlife.

    2
    8
  2. Posted by divide & conquer on

    It is disgusting what with the way that the hawks have railroaded everyone into conflict after conflict. Asserting our north’s sovereignty is a spin off the global US engineered Empire plans, which is on examination is an extension of corporate power. Where there are billions and now trillions of dollars in the pot the carrot and the stick method continues unrelenting. Ukraine, China, Russia, Taiwan conflicts are there to buttress. Notably Julian Assange gets the stick while Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and defence industry businesses and the Washington insiders have the carrot. Disgusting.

    5
    21
    • Posted by John K on

      Is this sarcastic? The explanation is in the article …

      1
      1
  3. Posted by Kenny on

    The Irving family is laughing all the way to the bank, thank you government of Canada.

    3
    2

Join the Conversation

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*