Nunavut court looking for justices of the peace in 12 communities

People appointed to role responsible for conducting marriages, hearing some court cases

The Nunavut Court of Justice is looking for people interested in becoming a justice of the peace in 12 communities. (File photo)

By Nunatsiaq News

Updated on June 15 at 9:45 a.m.

The Nunavut Court of Justice is looking for people interested in becoming a justice of the peace in several communities across the territory.

People are needed to fill the role in Kimmirut, Clyde River, Pangnirtung, Pond Inlet, Sanirajak, Resolute Bay, Naujaat, Taloyoak, Gjoa Haven, Kugluktuk, Sanikiluaq and Arctic Bay.

The role comes with responsibilities that include presiding over court cases, conducting bail hearings, signing search warrants and conducting marriages. 

Those appointed will receive specialized training, according to the posting. 

The request for applicants does not list a legal background in the requirements to apply — applicants need to be at least 19 years old and a resident of Nunavut for the past 12 months. 

The court’s appointment committee also considers an applicant’s knowledge of the community, and knowledge of Inuit language and societal values. 

According to Nunavut’s Justice of the Peace Act, anybody who is appointed may remain in the role until they reach 75 years of age, leave Nunavut, or are removed from his or her post for reasons laid out in the act.

The court asks anybody interested in applying to send in a resume, cover letter and three references along with documentation that proves they meet the eligibility criteria to ncj.chambers@gov.nu.ca.

The committee that considers the applicants is composed of a member recommended by a senior judge; a judge of the Nunavut Court of Justice; a justice of the peace; and two members of the public who are not Government of Nunavut employees.

There is no deadline to apply.

Correction: This article has been updated to reflect the current policy that sets out who sits on the committee that considers applicants to become a justice of the peace. 

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(5) Comments:

  1. Posted by My experience with JPs on

    No JP in Iqaluit could return a call or email despite multiple attempts to perform a wedding ceremony for me.

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  2. Posted by clam on

    “The request for applicants does not list a legal background in the requirements to apply — applicants need to be at least 19 years old and a resident of Nunavut for the past 12 months. ”

    That is bothersome. Decisions about whether people will remain locked up or on bail or about violating conditions go before JPs, whether or not an allegedly abusive spouse will get to go back home will go before a JP. Not just petty crime, either. Today, for example, according to the court docket that is available to the general public, someone who is being charged with kidnapping and aggravated assault, the most severe form of assault short of murder, will be appearing before a JP rather than a judge.

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    • Posted by John W Paul Murphy on

      Highly unlikely the person you are referring to is appearing on trial.
      Rather should they be held in custody pending trial or will they be released (usually with lots of conditions).
      JPs are trained to cover all of their responsibilities including summary trials.

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    • Posted by Not unusual on

      I agree that people with legal backgrounds are best-suited for the JP role, but (in case anyone assumed otherwise), this isn’t a Nunavut thing — does *any* province or territory limit JP jobs to people with legal experience? Ontario definitely doesn’t. BC doesn’t either, although I think it only puts those with legal backgrounds in court.
      In NU, there are four different levels of JPs; not all of them are allowed to preside at contested court hearings.

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      • Posted by John W Paul Murphy on

        JP Training Levels

        There are four levels of JP training for this program and three special designations:

        Level1- Orientation & Administration

        conduct weddings
        sign statutory declarations & administer oaths
        receive informations
        issue or cancel summons, arrestwarrants & appearance notices
        grant adjournments
        sign consent releases & comittals

        Level2- Show Cause & Search Warrants

        accept guilty or not guilty pleas
        conduct judicial interim release hearings (including for youth court)
        issue or cancel search warrants
        issue warrants to enter & arrest

        Level3- Sentencing & SOTls- Ex- Parte Trials

        sentence summary conviction & SOTI guilty pleas
        conduct ex-parte trials on SOTI matters

        Level 4- Trials-

        conduct trials of summary conviction, NunavutStatutes & By-Laws
        breach of conditional sentencing hearings
        peace bond applications
        adjournment of child welfare hearings

        Designations

        youth court judges(YC)
        telewarrants(TW)
        designation to work under the Family Abuse Intervention Act(FAIA)

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