Arts and Culture

Kuujjuaq kids receive a lesson in muskrat anatomy

Kindergarten students at Pitakallak Elementary School in Kuujjuaq learn about the anatomy of a muskrat during a lesson by Ayaana Berthe, who also explains the importance of respecting the animal and how to prepare its fur. The animal was caught by Simon Berthe up the Kuujjuaq River. (Photo by Malaya Qaunirq Chapman)

Iqaluit’s elders enjoy an Afro‐Caribbean dinner

Inuit elders enjoy delectable Afro‐Caribbean food during the African Caribbean Association of Nunavut’s inaugural Elder Appreciation dinner on Sept. 19 at the Qajuqturvik Community Food Centre in Iqaluit. Association President Mkhabela Masuku said that “the purpose was to highlight our gratitude to the elders and knowledge keepers for all they have done in the community.” (Photo by Denis Ndeloh)

Digging it

Clam diggers search around an exposed rock at Qaummaarviit, north of Sylvia Grinnell Territorial Park, before heading to the mainland, seen in the background, on Sunday, Sept. 20. (Photo by Mosha Folger)

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Big haul at Kuujjuaq’s berry-picking and suvalik-mixing events

Sylvia Labranche of Kuujjuaq and her son Tyson make suvalik after spending the day picking berries on Sept. 12. Suvalik is sometimes described as an Inuit fruit salad, made from a mayonaise-like emulsion of fish eggs and oil, with fresh berries added later. Tyson won a total of $450 that day during competitions organized by the local recreation committee. He won $200 by placing first in his age category for picking blackberries, with a haul of 5.9 pounds, and $100 for third place picking blueberries, with half a pound. He later won another $150 for placing second in the suvalik-making contest. “Not bad for a day out with his mom,” writes photographer Isabelle Dubois. (Photo by Isabelle Dubois)

Making suvalik in Kuujjuaq

Samantha Snowball of Kuujjuaq participates in a suvalik-making contest on Sept. 12. The delicacy is sometimes described as an Inuit fruit salad. Its base is a mayonnaise-like emulsion made by whisking fish eggs and vegetable oil together with a bit of water. Fresh berries are then added to the mix. (Photo by Isabelle Dubois)

“The Locals” take the stage in Kuujjuaq

“The Locals” take the stage at the second Aqpik Road Show in Kuujjuaq on Tuesday, Sept. 1, outside the Katittavik Town Hall Theatre. Local musicians Peter Nassak (left) and Derek Tagoona (centre), both of whom are on vocals and guitar, Adamie D. Alaku (right) on bass and backup vocals, and Willis Tagoona (drums), entertained the crowd with cover versions of popular songs. The event, at which the audience watched and listened in their vehicles, was organized by Katittavik Town Hall Theatre technical director Liam Callaghan in lieu of the usual Aqpik Jam Music Festival, which couldn’t take place due to the pandemic restrictions. (Photo by Isabelle Dubois)

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Emerging talent at Aqpik Road Show in Kuujjuaq

Niivi Snowball, 12, makes her debut as a soloist at the second Aqpik Road Show in Kuujjuaq on Tuesday, Sept. 1, outside the Katittavik Town Hall Theatre. The event, at which the audience watched and listened in their vehicles, was organized by Katittavik Town Hall Theatre technical director Liam Callaghan, in lieu of the usual Aqpik Jam Music Festival that couldn’t take place due to the pandemic restrictions. Snowball, whose father is Kuujjuaq musician Etua Snowball, a.k.a. Sinuupa, sang her song “Broken Mirror,” for which she wrote the lyrics and the music, and played the accompaniment on her ukulele. (Photo by Isabelle Dubois)

West Baffin Co-op and Canada Goose team up to promote Inuit art

The West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative says it will continue its partnership with Canada Goose in support of Kinngait artists. Known for its parkas, Canada Goose has developed within its retail stores a large collection of Inuit art, much of it from Kinngait, the co-op said in a recent release. In addition to buying drawings, prints and carvings, Canada Goose has also commissioned original art installations for its stores. Kinngait artists are now showcased in Banff, Beijing, Boston, Calgary, Chicago, Edmonton, Harbin, Hong Kong, London, Milan, Minneapolis, Montreal, New Jersey, New York, Paris, Shanghai, Shenyang, Toronto and Vancouver. “We are pleased to count an internationally renowned company like Canada Goose as one of our friends and supporters,” said West Baffin Eskimo Cooperative President Pauloosie Kowmageak. (Photo courtesy of the West Baffin Eskimo Co-op)

Baleen

Baleen by Shuvinai Ashoona, is a special edition print that’s included with this year’s sale. It’s in recognition of the artist winning the 2018 Gershon Iskowitz Prize for her outstanding contribution to the visual arts in Canada. (Image courtesy of Dorset Fine Arts)