Southern Canada

Arctic scientist named to Order of Canada

John England helped establish Canada’s northernmost park, on Ellesmere Island

Arctic scientist and naturalist John England is invested into the Order of Canada by Gov. Gen. Mary Simon at a ceremony at Rideau Hall on Friday. An advocate for Arctic science and policy, England was named an Officer of Canada for his more than 50 years of research on the impact of environmental change on the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and for his role in establishing Quttinirpaaq National Park, the country’s northernmost park, on Ellesmere Island. England was one of 23 Canadians named to the Order this year. (Photo courtesy of Sgt. Mathieu St-Amour/Office of the Secretary of the Gov. Gen.)

Kicking off the UN’s Decade of Indigenous Languages with a song

Inuk-Mohawk singer Beatrice Deer performs at the Canadian launch of the UN’s International Decade of Indigenous Languages, at the Royal Canadian Geographic Society in Ottawa April 22. Deer, originally from Nunavik, sang a medley of songs in Inuktitut at the event co-hosted by Gov. Gen. Mary Simon and former National Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde. (Photo by Madalyn Howitt)

Lighting a flame for language preservation

Inuk elder Aigah Attagutsiak lights the qulliq as Anishinaabe drummer Odeshkun Thusky looks on at the Canadian launch of the UN’s International Decade of Indigenous Languages at the Royal Canadian Geographic Society in Ottawa on April 22. The event was co-hosted by Gov. Gen. Mary Simon and former National Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde.(Photo by Madalyn Howitt)

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ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᐃᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᖃᑎᒌᒃᑎᖏᑦ ᑎᓕᐅᕆᖕᒪᑕ ᐋᑐᕙᐅᑉ ᓄᓇᓕᐸᐅᔭᖓᓂᒃ ᐃᓱᒪᒃᓴᖅᓯᐅᕈᑎᖃᒃᑲᓐᓂᖁᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᓄᑖᒥᒃ ᐋᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᓕᐅᕐᕕᒋᓂᐊᖅᑕᒥᖕᓂᒃ ᓄᓇᒥ

ᐋᑐᕙᒥ ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᐃᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᖃᑎᒌᒃᑎᖏᑦ ᑐᒃᓯᕋᐳᑎᖃᕐᒪᑕ ᓄᓇ ᐊᑐᖅᑕᐅᖔᖁᓪᓗᒍ ᓴᐃᒻᒪᖃᑎᒌᖕᓂᓕᕆᓂᕐᒧᑦ

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Lighting up the city

Three Thousand, a short film by Inuit filmmaker Asinnajaq, is projected on the five-storey glass tower above the National Arts Centre in Ottawa on March 16. The film is part of the NAC Indigenous Theatre festival “Qaummatitsiniq nunarjuamit qaujimajakkanik” or “Lighting up the world with my knowledge.” From March 16 to 20, archival images, animations and original digital works will be available for public viewing three times per evening, and they are also available to view online. Other Inuit artists whose work is being screened include Megan Kyak-Monteith, Jobie Weetaluktuk, Echo Henoche and Siku Allooloo. (Photo by Madalyn Howitt)

Arctic infrastructure meets diplomacy

Madeleine Redfern (second from left), the executive director of the northern branch of Arctic360, poses with organizers and participants at the third annual Arctic360 conference in Toronto on March 10. The three-day conference was an opportunity for diplomats, investors and business owners from Arctic nations to discuss infrastructure, security and innovation in the global Arctic. Notably absent from conference panels were representatives from Russia, who were removed from the event following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on Feb. 24. From left to right: Helene Scherling Olsen, senior adviser with the Danish Trade Council; Redfern; Jessica Shadian, Arctic360 president and CEO; Hanne Fugl Eskjaer, Kingdom of Denmark ambassador to Canada. (Photo by Madalyn Howitt)