Iqaluit hunter finds human remains believed to be Ambar Roy’s

Youth, 18, was last seen on March 13, 2019

The Iqaluit RCMP have recovered the human remains of a male person believed to be Ambar Roy, 18, who was last seen on March 13, 2019. (File photo)

By Jim Bell

An Iqaluit hunter has found the human remains of a male person believed to be Ambar Roy, 18, who was last seen on March 13, 2019, the Iqaluit RCMP said on Feb. 16 in a news release.

The hunter notified police at around 2 p.m., on Feb. 15 and led RCMP members to the site, where they recovered the remains.

“Information from the recovery site leads RCMP to believe the remains are those of missing person Ambar Roy,” the RCMP news release said.

In March 2019, more than 60 volunteer searchers, along with RCMP members and staff from Nunavut Emergency Management, spent nearly two weeks searching for Ambar Roy on foot and by snowmobile, to no avail. (File photo)

Police did the recovery at the north end of a body of water called Unnamed Lake, about 1.5 kilometres from a bridge on the Road to Nowhere that police refer to as the “Apex River Bridge.”

The last person to see Roy before he went missing was an Iqaluit taxi driver who had dropped Roy off at that spot on March 13.

He had spent part of the previous evening in police custody after being sent away from the damp shelter on the grounds that he was under the age of 19.

The youth, who had arrived in Iqaluit on March 11 from Waterloo, Ont., where he had been attending the University of Waterloo, had been caught vaping twice on the airport ramp.

Because of that, Canadian North barred him from boarding a March 12 flight to the south.

After Roy went missing, more than 60 volunteer searchers along with RCMP members and staff from Nunavut Emergency Management combed the area for days, on foot and by snowmobile.

At the same time, a local Iqaluit business used drones to search the area.

But on March 27, the RCMP, believing Roy had succumbed to the elements, called off the search.

In July of 2019, a helicopter searched the area, but found nothing.

Police say they have turned the human remains over to the Nunavut coroner’s office so they can be examined and identified.

They have also informed Roy’s parents, Bijoya and Amal Roy, the news release said.

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